Chandernagore


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Chandernagore

(ˌtʃʌndənəˈɡɔː)
n
(Placename) a port in E India, in S West Bengal on the Hooghly River: a former French settlement (1686–1950). Pop: 162 166 (2001)
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References in classic literature ?
French, too was vital, and the best was to be picked up in Chandernagore a few miles from Calcutta.
1 lakh people; largely originating from French enclaves of Puducherry, Karaikal, Yanam, Mahe and Chandernagore.
Contacts between France and India date far back in time; they are anterior to the French East India Company and to its trading posts, of which Pondicherry and Chandernagore remain the most famous.
Antara Mukherjee Department of English Chandernagore College, Chandernagore, Hooghly
Desde alli visita Chandernagore, Madras, Point de Galle.
The final--yet perhaps the most charming stop--is Chandernagore (within shouting distance from Bandel).
While Serampore, then called Frederiksnag after Danish king Frederik V, who ruled between 1746 and 1799, tops the priority list, not much has been done for Bandel, set up as a Portuguese colony, the erstwhile Dutch colony of Chinsurah, the French Chandernagore or Barrackpore set up by the British.
Carton opens his work with the case of Maria Texeira, a Catholic Eurasian woman descended from Portuguese settlers, living in the French colony of Chandernagore in Bengal, and her legal status as European under British rule following the British occupation of Chandernagore in the late eighteenth century.
Over five hundred would-be colonists, including the above-mentioned peasants from Italy, sailed in four ships, Chandernagore, Genil, India, and Nouvelle Bretagne, between 1879 and 1881, with the first detachment landing on New Ireland on January 16, 1880.
Sail down from Kolkata to Varanasi for 14 nights and 15 days crossing Bodhgaya, Nalanda, Chandernagore Palace and Rajmahal in West Bengal for $ 14,895 per couple ( Rs 7 lakh).
94) The British takeover also had included an assault on the French factory at Chandernagore, which removed the Compagnie des Indes from play.
The same author tells of later 'English theatres of a rather ephemeral nature' in the wider neighbourhood, at Chandernagore (1808), Kidderpore (1815) and Dum Dum (1817, a cantonment theatre), and others named as the Athenaeum (1812), the fashionable Private Subscription Theatre (1813) and the Sans Souci (1839, rebuilt 1841).