chapelry


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chapelry

n, pl -ries
(Ecclesiastical Terms) the district legally assigned to and served by an Anglican chapel

Chapelry

 a congregation of nonconformist chapel-goers, 1707.
References in periodicals archive ?
LINDLEY, a village, a township, and a chapelry in Huddersfield parish, West Riding Yorkshire, stands on high ground.
Aungier, The History and Antiquities of Syon Monastery, the Parish of Isleworth, and the Chapelry of Hounslow (London, 1840), 81-2.
In his Buildings of England he describes St Giles as: "rebuilt, slightly W of its medieval predecessor (a chapelry of Suckley) by Henry Rowe and Son 1892/3 for JF Greswolde-Williams; closed 1972, now a house.
58) In 1662, Elizabeth Ness and Alice Theakston of Slingsby were cited for practicing without licenses, as were Ann Saville and Margaret Fisher of Kirbymoorside and Jane Gamble and Ann Anderson from a small chapelry in the same parish.
A chapelry in the parish of Aston, which lay in Warwickshire, Yardley itself was in Worcestershire.
In 1110, King Henry I gave the Chapelry of Eres-dun to Tynemouth Priory which was established by monks at St Albans.
Urban settings (such as Yeovil, Wells, or Glastonbury, all cited above) involved processional movement through the streets and around the market cross en route to the church house; villages (such as Dundry, Pawlett, or Sampford Brett) seem to have used church and churchyard and/or village greens, and sometimes to have processed between mother church and chapelry or other dependencies; parishes in areas of large open fields or on remote hills (such as Milborne Port or Skilgate respectively, both cited above) made mimetic use of those expanses--but all within the context of universally understood parish values and similar forms of performance.
Until the early decades of the nineteenth century it had been the most populous chapelry in the rapidly expanding parish of Bradford.
The practical problems which led to this result can be illustrated in miniature by examining the careers of William Grimshaw and Patrick Bronte, both of whom spent their mature years as Perpetual Curates of the remote Pennine chapelry of Haworth.
Ecclesiastically they are or were a chapelry of Rochdale in the way that Honley was once a chapelry of Almondbury.
Aungier, History and Antiquities of Syon Monastery, the Parish of Isleworth, and the Chapelry of Hounslow (London, UK: J.
But it was not an independent place of worship - rather it was a chapelry of St Peter and Paul in Aston, which came under the Bishop of Lichfield.