amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

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a·my·o·tro·phic lateral sclerosis

 (ā′mī-ə-trō′fĭk, -trŏf′ĭk, ā-mī′-)
n. Abbr. ALS
A chronic, progressive disease marked by gradual degeneration of the nerve cells in the spinal cord that control voluntary muscle movement, causing muscle weakness, atrophy, and eventual paralysis. Also called Lou Gehrig's disease.

amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

(ˌæmɪəʊˈtrəʊfɪk)
n
(Pathology) a form of motor neurone disease in which degeneration of motor tracts in the spinal cord causes progressive muscular paralysis starting in the limbs. Also called: Lou Gehrig's disease

a•my•o•troph′ic lat′eral sclero′sis

(ˌeɪ maɪ əˈtrɒf ɪk, -ˈtroʊ fɪk, eɪˌmaɪ ə-)
n.
a nervous system disease in which degeneration of motor neurons in the brain stem and spinal cord leads to atrophy and paralysis of the voluntary muscles. Abbr.: ALS Also called Lou Gehrig's disease.
[1885–90; a-6 + myo- + -trophic]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.amyotrophic lateral sclerosis - thickening of tissue in the motor tracts of the lateral columns and anterior horns of the spinal cordamyotrophic lateral sclerosis - thickening of tissue in the motor tracts of the lateral columns and anterior horns of the spinal cord; results in progressive muscle atrophy that starts in the limbs
nervous disorder, neurological disease, neurological disorder - a disorder of the nervous system
induration, sclerosis - any pathological hardening or thickening of tissue
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to paving the way for psychoanalysis, Charcot identified a number of neurological diseases, including two that bear his name (Charcot-Marie-Tooth and Charcot's disease, what Europeans call ALS/Lou Gehrig's).
Michael Micale surmises that "everything in Charcot's disease model had its place: a uniform etiology, a clear hierarchy of symptoms, and a paroxysm that followed a prescribed developmental sequence" (93).
Cerebral spinal sclerosis was named Charcot's disease for the famous French physician Jean Martin Charcot, who is also famous as Sigmund Freud's teacher.