Charing Cross


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Char·ing Cross

 (chăr′ĭng)
A district of London, England, where Edward I erected (c. 1290) the last of a series of crosses in memory of his wife, Eleanor of Castile.

Charing Cross

(ˈtʃærɪŋ)
n
(Placename) a district of London, in the city of Westminster: the modern cross (1863) in front of Charing Cross railway station replaces the one erected by Edward I (1290), the last of twelve marking the route of the funeral procession of his queen, Eleanor
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References in classic literature ?
House-surgeon, from 1882 to 1884, at Charing Cross Hospital.
I will send a messenger to Souspennier to meet you at Charing Cross to-night.
Master and man then descended, the street-door was double-locked, and at the end of Saville Row they took a cab and drove rapidly to Charing Cross.
Then he paid his account and walked rapidly down the Strand past Charing Cross Station.
I've been to Charing Cross one way and nearly to Ludgate Circus the other; and they were all engaged.
Before parting they had made an arrangement that she should write to Charing Cross Post Office till he was able to send her an address, and when he went there he found three letters from her.
He entered an hotel near Charing Cross, and ordered some refreshment and a bed.
The very boot-blacks in the basement of Charing Cross Station know something of it.
He lounged along moodily, and stopped at Charing Cross to look about him, with as little interest in the crowd as any man might take, and was lounging on again, when a most unexpected object caught his eyes.
It was Denham who, having parted from Sandys at the bottom of his staircase, was now walking to the Tube at Charing Cross, deep in the thoughts which his talk with Sandys had suggested.
I shall leave the city about that time and walk to Charing Cross on the left-hand side of the way; if there are any letters, come and meet me, and bring them with you.
There was a blank stillness for a measurable time, so that they could hear far off a flower-girl's laugh outside Charing Cross, and someone whistling furiously for a taxicab in one of the streets off the Strand.