charismatic movement

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charismatic movement

n
1. (Protestantism) Christianity any of various groups, within existing denominations, that emphasize communal prayer and the charismatic gifts of speaking in tongues, healing, etc
2. (Roman Catholic Church) Christianity any of various groups, within existing denominations, that emphasize communal prayer and the charismatic gifts of speaking in tongues, healing, etc
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The seven contributors of Part II deal with developments, movements, and trends in relation to the evolution of Asian theology; cultural and linguistic issues in translating the Bible into Asian languages; Asian contributions to the global ecumenical movement; global and inter-Asian missionary movements; Pentecostal and charismatic movements in Asia; Indigenous Christianities; and Asian feminist movements.
Lederle, Theology with Spirit: The Future of Pentecostal and Charismatic Movements in the 21st Century (Tulsa, OK: Word & Spirit Press, 2010), pp.
The book makes a significant contribution to the ongoing effort to revise the periodization of black political history, which has all too often been seen either as a succession of charismatic movements led by visionary men, or as a long series of confrontations between charismatic male rivals.
Seymour and the Azusa Street Revival, African American trinitarian and oneness Pentecostal denominations, the role of women in African American Pentecostalism, African American neo-Pentecostals and charismatic movements, Black Pentecostals in majority-white denominations, and the theological challenges of Black Pentecostalism in the twenty-first century.
Harrell is an experienced biographer, having produced a definitive account of Oral Roberts's career as well as an earlier campaign biography of Robertson in 1987; he is also a leading interpreter of American pentecostal and charismatic movements.
Johnson, "Global Statistics," in New International Dictionary of Pentecostal Charismatic Movements, ed.
The final part, Wesley's legacy, has four papers examining the spread of Methodism, the relation of the Pentecostal and charismatic movements to Methodism, the growth of Negro Methodist churches in the US, and, finally, the current state of play concerning Wesley's legacy.
Longer entries are included for broader topics, including African charismatic churches, anti-cult movement, Baha'i, Buddhism in the West, charismatic movements, gender and new religious movements, liberation theology, and the new Christian right.
Overall, Lancaster Conference in the 1950s was not traumatized by divisions caused by charismatic movements.
Calix said both the Neocatechumenal and charismatic movements, with their ready answers to personal and societal problems, represent "a kind of fundamentalism to confront an unstable society and unstable church.
For example, in traditional terms he identifies four approaches to the life, death, resurrection and ascension of Jesus that have shaped Christology: "1) the incarnational Christology of the early Church and Catholicism; 2) the theology of the cross of Protestantism, especially of the Lutheran tradition; 3) the resurrection and ascension Christology of Eastern Orthodoxy; 4) the empowerment Christology of Pentecostalism and the Charismatic movements.
The ecumenical movement has taken several forms, all of which have caused baptism to be reappraised: institutional changes, theological developments, and the liturgical and charismatic movements.