Charles V


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Related to Charles V: Phillip II

Charles V

1500-1558.
Holy Roman emperor (1519-1558) and king of Spain as Charles I (1516-1556). He expanded Spain's territories in the New World and responded to the Protestant Reformation by summoning the Diet of Worms (1521) and the Council of Trent (1545-1563).

Charles V

n
1. (Biography) known as Charles the Wise. 1337–80, king of France (1364–80) during the Hundred Years' War
2. (Biography) 1500–58, Holy Roman Emperor (1519–56), king of Burgundy and the Netherlands (1506–55), and, as Charles I, king of Spain (1516–56): his reign saw the empire threatened by Francis I of France, the Turks, and the spread of Protestantism; abdicated
References in periodicals archive ?
By the Translation of Empire the Habsburg Emperors were by tradition still the rulers of the world de iure, although this designation had become a mere formality for Charles V (Wilson 2011; Birdal 2011, Ch 5; Scales 2012, Ch.
Music and Ceremony at the Court of Charles V addresses ceremonial music, including masses, motets, and chansons.
At several points, de Armas sees Don Quixote as a stand-in for Charles V, "consumed by illness but steeling himself onward, hoping for a miracle" (93), but he is, as evoked in context, the ailing emperor as portrayed by Titian.
Paul Getty Museum's current exhibition, 'Imagining the Past in France, 1250-1500', are several large manuscripts that belonged to the noted bibliophile, King Charles V of France (r.
Thus Sultan Suleyman the Lawgiver (1520-66) used Hayreddin Barbarossa to keep the Spaniards busy in home waters, while Charles V (1517-55) and Philip II of Spain (1556-98) backed campaigns in the eastern Mediterranean by Andrea Doria of Genoa and the Knights of Malta.
Nevertheless, the Burgundian example of a large and relatively well-endowed body of musicians exerted great influence throughout the period, particularly those rulers most immediately under the Burgundian spell like Charles V (1526-1566) and Philip II (1566-1598).
Alistair Dixon's group La Chapelle Du Roi stakes its claim simultaneously to Tallis and, more unusually, the Burgundian and Spanish Courts of Charles V, father of Philip II of Spain.
After the succession of the future Emperor Charles v to the thrones of both Castille and Aragon, in 1516, both of these cities were in the possession of the House of Austria.
It will no doubt become indispensable to scholars of Netherlandish music and culture, particularly the Burgundian-Habsburg courts of Philip the Fair, Marguerite of Austria, and Charles V.
The brief introduction is followed by one chapter chronicling the diplomatic highs and lows of Spain's ambassadors in Venice during this period, while the next three chapters do the same for the Spanish ambassadors in Rome under Charles V, during the first half of Philip II's reign up to the collapse of the Holy League in 1573, and during the second half of Philip's reign.
The subject of both collections is the incredible career of Charles V, whose improbable and incoherent dynastic inheritance drew him into every possible political and religious situation between 1520 and 1556.
McGowan, "The Renaissance Triumph and its Classical Heritage"; Richard Cooper, "Court Festival and Triumphal Entries under Henri II"; Monique Chatenet, "Etiquette and Architecture at the Court of the Last Valois"; Nicholas Le Roux, "The Politics of Festivals at the Court of the Last Valois"; Chantal Grell, "The Financing and Material Organization of Court Festivals under Louis XIV"; Bernhard Schimmelpfennig, "The Two Coronations of Charles V at Bologna, 1530"; R.