Charles VI


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Related to Charles VI: Henry V

Charles VI

n
1. (Biography) known as Charles the Mad or Charles the Well-Beloved. 1368–1422, king of France (1380–1422): defeated by Henry V of England at Agincourt (1415), he was forced by the Treaty of Troyes (1420) to recognize Henry as his successor
2. (Biography) 1685–1740, Holy Roman Emperor (1711–40). His claim to the Spanish throne (1700) led to the War of the Spanish Succession
References in classic literature ?
Charles VI relapsed six times into madness during the year 1399, sometimes during the new, sometimes during the full moon.
The old Habsburg line died with Charles VI and the new Habsburg Lorraine dynasty took its place.
Their vast army had answered the call of their King Charles VI, who although suffering bouts of insanity, wasn't daft enough to let our Henry off the hook.
The King of France, Charles VI, was suffering from bouts of mental illness and had even been so deluded as to refuse to hand over his crown.
For the Emperors Leopold I, Joseph I, Charles VI, Charles VII (a non-Habsburg), and Francis Stephen the "Holy" simply meant Catholic, as opposed to the Protestant territories in the northern part of the Empire.
Indeed, in 1394, Charles VI forbade any Hebrews from dwelling in his kingdom.
One by one the stallions trotted in and their riders doffed their hats to the huge portrait of Emperor Charles VI astride his white stallion.
For example, maybe Joan of Arc had the gift of hearing spirit voices without using an EVP recorder and these spirits gave her intelligent advice on how to defeat the English at Patay so that Charles VI could be crowned king of France.
It is a revision of part of the aria Reviresce, efloresce from Zelenka's melodrama Sub olea pacis, ZWV 175, performed in Prague in 1723 to mark the coronation of Emperor Charles VI.
Vivaldi moved to Vienna in the hope of preferment after meeting Emperor Charles VI, but the emperor died soon afterwards, leaving the composer to end his life a pauper.
Coupled with such relatively familiar fare, however, there are such rarities as Halevy's Charles VI and, notably, a powerful aria from Andre Wormser's Clytemnestre (1875) in which the guilty queen pleads with the ghost of the murdered Agamemnon for forgiveness.
Henry V took part in handto-hand fighting while their bloke, Charles VI, had a nervous breakdown.