Charles VI


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Related to Charles VI: Henry V

Charles VI

n
1. (Biography) known as Charles the Mad or Charles the Well-Beloved. 1368–1422, king of France (1380–1422): defeated by Henry V of England at Agincourt (1415), he was forced by the Treaty of Troyes (1420) to recognize Henry as his successor
2. (Biography) 1685–1740, Holy Roman Emperor (1711–40). His claim to the Spanish throne (1700) led to the War of the Spanish Succession
References in classic literature ?
Charles VI relapsed six times into madness during the year 1399, sometimes during the new, sometimes during the full moon.
King Charles VI of France and five noblemen were dancing at a ball when their costumes caught fire.
He had gone there to see 'Paris 1400: Art during the reign of Charles VI' yet, despite the Louvre show, no one else had seemed to notice that this limestone figure came from the canopy of the tomb of Charles VI and Isabeau de Baviere in Saint-Denis.
The queen thereby put trust in the army over the unreliable diplomacy of her father, Charles VI.
After Zeno accepted an invitation in 1717 from Emperor Charles VI to act as imperial poet in Vienna, his dramas became even more elevated and more invested in noble themes.
The remaining Austrian branch became extinct in the male line in 1740 with the death of Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI, and completely in 1780 with the death of his eldest daughter Maria Theresa of Austria.
Following her persuasive study The Life and Afterlife of Isabeau of Bavaria (Baltimore, 2010), which provided a rehabilitation of this much-maligned spouse of the French king Charles VI, Adams now tackles the political allegiance of Christine de Pizan in late medieval France, a country in the midst of a hundred year conflict with England and eventually tom apart by civil war.
II diamante and Alcune Arie Cavate dalle diverse Opere, poste in Musica bear witness to Zelenka's having been capable of writing brilliant secular vocal music for Dresden (after all, he had proved his mastery in this respect back in his work Sub olea pads, which in 1 723 was performed to mark the coronation in Prague of Emperor Charles VI as King of Bohemia).
The King of France, Charles VI, was suffering from bouts of mental illness and had even been so deluded as to refuse to hand over his crown.
Indeed, in 1394, Charles VI forbade any Hebrews from dwelling in his kingdom.
One by one the stallions trotted in and their riders doffed their hats to the huge portrait of Emperor Charles VI astride his white stallion.