Charles XII

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Charles XII

n
(Biography) 1682–1718, king of Sweden (1697–1718), who inflicted defeats on Denmark, Russia, and Poland during the Great Northern War (1700–21)
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Tauris, 2003); Robert I Frost, The Northern Wars: War, State and Society in Northeastern Europe 1558-1721 (Longman, 2000); Anthony F Upton, Charles XI and Swedish Absolutista, 1660-1697 (Cambridge University Press, 1998); Michael Roberts, The Swedish Imperial Experience 1560-1718 (Cambridge University Press, 1979); Ragnhild M Hatton, Charles XII of Sweden (Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1968).
HE'S camp, sings songs about Charles XII of Sweden and looks like he shops at Lidl for clothes.
Part 4, "Johnson and Politics," pours down a torrent of erudite hot lava on the belief that Johnson refused as an Oxford student to swear allegiance to the new Hanoverian dynasty or that he meant the portrait of Charles XII of Sweden in The Vanity of Human Wishes as a coded eulogy for Charles Edward Stuart and his Jacobite invasion of England.
Based on a poem by Pushkin, the opera, which had its premiere in 1884 at the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow, details the quest for Ukrainian independence from Russia in the early 18th century, ending in the defeat of the ambitious Cossack leader, Mazeppa, and his cohort in the grand scheme, Charles XII of Sweden, by Peter the Great at Poltava.
Matthew Davis unearths some scattered 'Stuart sympathies' among Johnson's notes to Richard II; Niall Mackenzie labours for thirty pages to convince 'waverers'--for we are clearly being asked to sign up to something--that the phrase 'While ladies interpose' in Johnson's Vanity of Human Wishes continues an alleged Jacobite comparison between Charles XII of Sweden and Charles Stuart.
Charles XII of Sweden seems to have been an unpleasant man.
I had an ancestor who went with King Charles XII of Sweden to fight Peter the Great (of Russia).
His Vanity of Human Wishes (1749) is among those works drawn from the closet of its apparently innocent moral status and, we are told, is a demonstrably Jacobite poem by a Jacobite author, as so well displayed in the portrait of Charles XII of Sweden.
In the Great Northern War, Charles XII of Sweden continued to win all his battles and was rapidly reducing Poland to helplessness.