charver


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charver

(ˈʃɑːvə)
n
1. a young woman
2. (Peoples) a young working-class person who dresses in casual sports clothes
References in periodicals archive ?
Hayden Brown said the 19-year-old had gone over to Brian Cahill, who "looked like an old school charver," to ask why he had pushed a girl they were with into a table.
The comic potential of this voice (as well as its capacity for savagery) is illustrated by a conversation Marsdyke invents between a breeding ram and the other ram in the pen, a "poor castrated sod who kept himself pot-of-one the rest of the year waiting for his charver the tup to come and stay, though I didn't know what the bugger it was them two had to talk about.
The initiative was targeted toward the state's bourgeoning Latino population, much of which increased as a result of the recent influx of immigrants from Mexico and Central America over the past decade (Cowan, Martinez, and Mendiola 1997; Camarillo and Bonilla 2001: 103-134; Durand, Massey, and Charver 2000: 1-15).
Robert Woodcock QC, for Harper, said: "One looked like an old school charver and one looked like a stripper?
He's the kind of market researcher responsible for giving his fellow census-takers less street cred than a charver dressed in last year's Toon top .
She must have felt like a charver at a Harry Potter book signing
Charva or charver probably has its roots in chava, a Romany word meaning "man" or "boy".
For instance, 'gadgy', now used to mean a man, was originally used to refer to non-gypsies, while charver, now a derogatory term, used to mean friend.
He is not the king charver from the local pub, nor the unruly teenage son of a neighbour.
Let's assume it's a regular verb, in which case I suppose it would go: "I charver, you charver, he/she charvers, we charver, you charver, they charver.
A clue lies in the term one correspondent has suggested for the phenomenon ( "housebling" with its derogatory connotations of the charver underclass.
Sand-dancers, used to refer to South Shields folk, is thought to be tied to the settlement of Arab sailors in the town in the 1920s, while charver is thought to be a Romany word introduced by travellers living around Newcastle.