Chaucer


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Chau·cer

 (chô′sər), Geoffrey 1340?-1400.
English poet whose writing presents a richly varied picture of life and values in late-medieval England. His works include The Book of the Duchess (c. 1370), Troilus and Criseyde (c.1385), and his masterpiece, the unfinished Canterbury Tales (c. 1385-c. 1400).

Chau·cer′i·an (chô-sîr′ē-ən) adj. & n.

Chaucer

(ˈtʃɔːsə)
n
(Biography) Geoffrey. ?1340–1400, English poet, noted for his narrative skill, humour, and insight, particularly in his most famous work, The Canterbury Tales. He was influenced by the continental tradition of rhyming verse. His other works include Troilus and Criseyde, The Legende of Good Women, and The Parlement of Foules

Chau•cer

(ˈtʃɔ sər)
n.
Geoffrey, 1340?–1400, English poet.
Chau•ce′ri•an (-ˈsɪər i ən)

adj., n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Chaucer - English poet remembered as author of the Canterbury Tales (1340-1400)Chaucer - English poet remembered as author of the Canterbury Tales (1340-1400)
References in classic literature ?
None of them, I presume, had ever read a page of my inditing, or would have cared a fig the more for me if they had read them all; nor would it have mended the matter, in the least, had those same unprofitable pages been written with a pen like that of Burns or of Chaucer, each of whom was a Custom-House officer in his day, as well as I.
I walk out into a nature such as the old prophets and poets, Menu, Moses, Homer, Chaucer, walked in.
I had some talk with one Langland and a man by the name of Chaucer - old-time poets - but it was no use, I couldn't quite understand them, and they couldn't quite understand me.
Within the shadow, I may figuratively say, of that religious edifice immortalized by Chaucer, which was anciently the resort of Pilgrims from the remotest corners of - in short,' said Mr.
He who first opens Chaucer, or any other ancient poet, is so much struck with the obsolete spelling, multiplied consonants, and antiquated appearance of the language, that he is apt to lay the work down in despair, as encrusted too deep with the rust of antiquity, to permit his judging of its merits or tasting its beauties.
But if one took a volume of Chaucer or Shelley from that rank, its absence irritated the mind like a gap in a man's front teeth.
Across the centuries Paul Boielle shook hands with Geoffrey Chaucer.
And therefore the rich poets, as Homer, Chaucer, Shakspeare, and Raphael, have obviously no limits to their works except the limits of their lifetime, and resemble a mirror carried through the street, ready to render an image of every created thing.
Indeed, as we afterwards found out, the language spoken by this people is an old-fashioned form of the Zulu tongue, bearing about the same relationship to it that the English of Chaucer does to the English of the nineteenth century.
It was not so with Chaucer, whom I loved from the first word of his which I found quoted in those lectures, and in Chambers's 'Encyclopaedia of English Literature,' which I had borrowed of my friend the organ-builder.
It is the assertion, the development, the product of those very different indispensable qualities of poetry, in the presence [8] of which the English is equal or superior to all other modern literature--the native, sublime, and beautiful, but often wild and irregular, imaginative power in English poetry from Chaucer to Shakespeare, with which Professor Minto deals, in his Characteristics of English Poets (Blackwood), lately reprinted.
the time of Chaucer, but are none the less hot in defence of those to