biochemistry

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bi·o·chem·is·try

 (bī′ō-kĕm′ĭ-strē)
n.
1. The study of the chemical substances and vital processes occurring in living organisms; biological chemistry; physiological chemistry.
2. The chemical composition of a particular living system or biological substance: viral biochemistry.

bi′o·chem′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj. & n.
bi′o·chem′i·cal·ly adv.
bi′o·chem′ist n.

biochemistry

(ˌbaɪəʊˈkɛmɪstrɪ)
n
(Biochemistry) the study of the chemical compounds, reactions, etc, occurring in living organisms
ˌbioˈchemical, biochemic adj
ˌbioˈchemically adv
ˌbioˈchemist n

bi•o•chem•is•try

(ˌbaɪ oʊˈkɛm ə stri)

n.
the scientific study of the chemical substances and processes of living matter.
[1880–85]
bi`o•chem′i•cal (-ɪ kəl) adj., n.
bi`o•chem′ic, adj.
bi`o•chem′i•cal•ly, adv.
bi`o•chem′ist, n.

bi·o·chem·is·try

(bī′ō-kĕm′ĭ-strē)
The scientific study of the chemical composition of living matter and of the chemical processes that go on in living organisms.

biochemistry

the study of the chemical processes that take place in living organisms. — biochemist, n. — biochemical, adj.
See also: Life

biochemistry

Study of the chemistry of life processes.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.biochemistry - the organic chemistry of compounds and processes occurring in organismsbiochemistry - the organic chemistry of compounds and processes occurring in organisms; the effort to understand biology within the context of chemistry
antagonism - (biochemistry) interference in or inhibition of the physiological action of a chemical substance by another having a similar structure
agonist - (biochemistry) a drug that can combine with a receptor on a cell to produce a physiological reaction
sequenator, sequencer - (chemistry) an apparatus that can determine the sequence of monomers in a polymer
enzymology - the branch of biochemistry dealing with the chemical nature and biological activity of enzymes
zymology, zymurgy - the branch of chemistry concerned with fermentation (as in making wine or brewing or distilling)
organic chemistry - the chemistry of compounds containing carbon (originally defined as the chemistry of substances produced by living organisms but now extended to substances synthesized artificially)
lysis - (biochemistry) dissolution or destruction of cells such as blood cells or bacteria
precursor - a substance from which another substance is formed (especially by a metabolic reaction)
cutin - (biochemistry) a waxy transparent material that occurs in the cuticle of plants and consists of highly polymerized esters of fatty acids
adenine, A - (biochemistry) purine base found in DNA and RNA; pairs with thymine in DNA and with uracil in RNA
adenosine - (biochemistry) a nucleoside that is a structural component of nucleic acids; it is present in all living cells in a combined form as a constituent of DNA and RNA and ADP and ATP and AMP
deoxyribonucleic acid, desoxyribonucleic acid, DNA - (biochemistry) a long linear polymer found in the nucleus of a cell and formed from nucleotides and shaped like a double helix; associated with the transmission of genetic information; "DNA is the king of molecules"
ribonucleic acid, RNA - (biochemistry) a long linear polymer of nucleotides found in the nucleus but mainly in the cytoplasm of a cell where it is associated with microsomes; it transmits genetic information from DNA to the cytoplasm and controls certain chemical processes in the cell; "ribonucleic acid is the genetic material of some viruses"
nucleic acid - (biochemistry) any of various macromolecules composed of nucleotide chains that are vital constituents of all living cells
cytochrome - (biochemistry) a class of hemoprotein whose principal biological function is electron transfer (especially in cellular respiration)
coenzyme Q, ubiquinone - any of several quinones found in living cells and that function as coenzymes that transfer electrons from one molecule to another in cell respiration
transcribe - convert the genetic information in (a strand of DNA) into a strand of RNA, especially messenger RNA
exergonic - (biochemistry) of a process accompanied by the release of energy; "diffusion is an exergonic process"
endergonic - (biochemistry) of a process accompanied by or requiring the absorption of energy; the products of the process are of greater free energy than the reactants; "photosynthesis is an endergonic process"
Translations
كِيمِياء حَيَوِيَّةكيمياء حَيَوِيَّه
биохимия
biochemie
biokemi
biokeemia
biokemia
biokemija
biokémia
biokimia
lífefnafræîi
生化学
생화학
biochemijabiochemikasbiocheminis
bioķīmijabioķīmijas-
biochimie
biochémia
biokemija
biokemi
ชีวเคมี
biyokimyabiokimya
hóa sinh

biochemistry

[ˈbaɪəʊˈkemɪstrɪ] Nbioquímica f

biochemistry

[ˌbaɪəʊˈkɛmɪstri] nbiochimie f

biochemistry

[ˈbaɪəʊˈkɛmɪstrɪ] nbiochimica

biochemistry

(baiəˈkemistri) noun
the chemistry of living things. He is studying the biochemistry of the blood; (also adjective) a biochemistry lecture.
ˌbioˈchemical (-mikəl) adjective
ˌbioˈchemist noun

biochemistry

كِيمِياء حَيَوِيَّة biochemie biokemi Biochemie βιοχημεία bioquímica biokemia biochimie biokemija biochimica 生化学 생화학 biochemie biokjemi biochemia bioquímica биохимия biokemi ชีวเคมี biyokimya hóa sinh 生物化学

bi·o·chem·is·try

n. bioquímica, ciencia que estudia los organismos vivos.

biochemistry

n bioquímica
References in classic literature ?
But such is the chemistry of life, that this small creature, this trifle of meat that moved, by being eaten, transmuted to the meat of the men the same power to move.
The Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum Knowledge Foundation invited the public to benefit from the five interactive sections, showcasing the achievements of Nobel laureates in five different areas of chemistry, namely: Chemistry of Life, Chemical Reactions, Elements, Molecules, and Chemistry Changing the World.
Students experience the Chemistry of Life exhibit at the Nobel Museum 2018, - KT photo by Dhes Handumon
It starts with finding liquid water, which is essential for the chemistry of life as we understand it.
As revealed in "Volcanoes: What's Hot and What's Not on Earth and in Our Solar System", the molten rock beneath our feet continues to shape our world and contributes to the chemistry of life itself.
These fluorescence microscopy studies establish that the zinc spark occurs in human egg biology, and that can be observed outside of the cell," said Professor Tom O'Halloran, a co-senior author and director of Northwestern University's Chemistry of Life Processes Institute, of a study that appeared April 26 in Scientific Reports.
In between the two extremes, Toomey treats the reader to some history of science, the basic chemistry of life, possible alternatives to life as we know it, artificial intelligence, quantum mechanics, and a comprehensive look at life as portrayed in science fiction.
Frederick Sanger, a British biochemist whose discoveries about the chemistry of life led to the decoding of the human genome and to the development of new drugs like human growth hormone, earning him two Nobel Prizes, a distinction held by only three other scientists, died Tuesday in Cambridge, England.

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