Chiapas

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Chi·a·pas

 (chē-ä′pəs)
A state of extreme southeast Mexico adjoining the Guatemalan border. Largely rural and underdeveloped, in the 1990s Chiapas became the site of a popular uprising against Mexico's federal government.

Chiapas

(Spanish ˈtʃjapas)
n
(Placename) a state of S Mexico: mountainous and forested; Maya ruins in the northeast; rich mineral resources. Capital: Tuxtla Gutiérrez. Pop: 3 920 515 (2000). Area: 73 887 sq km (28 816 sq miles)

Chi•a•pas

(tʃiˈɑ pɑs)

n.
a state in S Mexico. 3,584,786; 28,732 sq. mi. (74,415 sq. km). Cap.: Tuxtla Gutiérrez.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus the movement creates spaces both virtually and physically; spaces that are intangible and tangible whether it be an exchange of ideas through written or spoken words on the Internet or in books, or in the middle of a Chiapan jungle.
Tliliuhquitepec Tliliuhquitepec (Tlaxcala) Chiapas Chiapan (Chapa de Mota, Estado de Mexico) en Tezozomoc.
These Chiapan cloud forests are known to have high species-diversity but are fragmented into small patches that increase their vulnerability (Cayuela et al.
They describe him as a figure who lived for 501 years as "a timid fire" in the death of the Indians, whose "step was and was not of [the Chiapan] lands," who is and is not "seed of [the Chiapan] soils," who "speaking, [silences] his words" in the mouths of the Indians, and manifests himself in all those involved with the Chiapan Indians, including the former revolutionary leader Emiliano Zapata.
Especially crucial in the portrait of the Chiapan crisis is Castellanos's experience of marginalization as a woman, about which she wrote throughout her writing career.
Zapatista economic and social programs include land redistribution, sharing the export-derived income from Chiapan resources, the right for peasants to market their products without middlemen, increased rural and urban salaries, accessible health care provision, education, and adequate infrastructure (water, electricity, roads, sewer systems, and communications).
Onesimo Hidalgo of the Chiapan organization CIEPAC (Center for Ecoonomic and Political Research), reports on these consequences of NAFTA there: "Chiapas once held second place in the production of corn on the national level; today it is sixth.
While ignored in Mexico City, Chiapan plantation owners frequently make news in Guatemala City for their despotic treatment of workers.
Una mencion expresa, pero sin vinculada en ningun momento con lo indigena, es la del antiguo nombre nahuatl de Chiapan.
Otra migracion desde el altiplano mexicano llevo a los antiguos chiapanecas, primero, a lo largo del Soconusco hacia las tierras de la actual Centroamerica y, despues, de regreso del rio Grijalva, donde conquistaron a los zoques y poblaron Chiapan ("Rio de la chia", segun el nombre dado por los aztecas mil anos despues).
Second, had Ruiz been successful in negotiating a solution to the Chiapan situation, the government would have owed the church a big favor.