Chicago


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Chi·ca·go

 (shĭ-kä′gō, -kô′-)
The largest city of Illinois, in the northeast part of the state on Lake Michigan. Located at the mouth of the Chicago River, the first link in the Illinois Waterway, it developed into a major port in the 1800s and became the commercial center of the Midwest. Chicago was nearly destroyed by a disastrous fire in 1871.

Chi·ca′go·an n.
Word History: The name Chicago is first recorded in 1688 in a French document, where it appears as Chigagou, an Algonquian word meaning "onion field." In explanation of this name, the document states that wild onion or garlic grew profusely in the area. The name of the field or meadow was first transferred to the river and then was given to the city in 1830.

Chicago

(ʃɪˈkɑːɡəʊ)
n
(Placename) a port in NE Illinois, on Lake Michigan: the third largest city in the US; it is a major railway and air traffic centre. Pop: 2 869 121 (2003 est)

Chi•ca•go

(ʃɪˈkɑ goʊ, -ˈkɔ-)

n.
a city in NE Illinois, on Lake Michigan: third largest city in the U.S. 2,721,547
Chi•ca′go•an, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Chicago - largest city in IllinoisChicago - largest city in Illinois; a bustling Great Lakes port that extends 26 miles along the southwestern shoreline of Lake Michigan
Sears Tower - a skyscraper built in Chicago in 1974; 1454 feet tall
University of Chicago - a university in Chicago, Illinois
IL, Illinois, Land of Lincoln, Prairie State - a midwestern state in north-central United States
2.Chicago - a gambling card game in which chips are placed on the ace and king and queen and jack of separate suits (taken from a separate deck); a player plays the lowest card of a suit in his hand and successively higher cards are played until the sequence stops; the player who plays a card matching one in the layout wins all the chips on that card
card game, cards - a game played with playing cards
Translations
Chicago
Чикаго
Ĉikago
شیکاگو
Chicago
Chicago
שיקגו
शिकागो
Chicago
シカゴ
시카고
Sicagum
Čikaga
Čikāga
ഷിക്കാഗോ
Чикаго
ชิคาโก
Chicago
References in classic literature ?
He came from Chicago and when he arrived was drunk and got into a fight with Albert Long- worth, the baggageman.
Beyond Chicago we were under the protection of a friendly passenger conductor, who knew all about the country to which we were going and gave us a great deal of advice in exchange for our confidence.
The reader, who perhaps has never held much converse in the language of far-off Lithuania, will be glad of the explanation that the place was the rear room of a saloon in that part of Chicago known as "back of the yards.
1,000 of her population (yearly average), Chicago was as constant with her 15 or 17, Dublin with her 48--and so on.
But must we really see Chicago in order to be educated?
By this time the Western Electric Company of Chicago had begun to make the infringing Gray-Edison telephones for the Western Union, so that there were soon six groups of mechanics puzzling their wits over the new talk-machinery.
was the owner of several hundred lots on the island of Manhattan; of one hundred and twenty-three in the city of Brooklyn; of nearly as many in Williamsburg; of large undivided interests in Milwaukie, Chicago, Rock River, Moonville, and other similar places; besides owning a considerable part of a place called Coney Island.
He lectured in cities as widely apart as Montreal, Chicago, Baltimore, and San Francisco, sailing to the last-named place in 1860, by way of Cape Horn, on the Meteor, commanded, by his younger brother, Captain Thomas Melville, afterward governor of the 'Sailor's Snug Harbor' at Staten Island, N.
Send 'Constance,' private car, here, and arrange for special to leave here Sunday in time to connect with New York Limited at Sixteenth Street, Chicago, Tuesday next.
Sartorial magicians in Chicago had not yet won over the young men of the great corn belt, with their snappy lines and style for the millions.
It was the site of an old encampment, with several empty Chicago meat tins, a bottle labeled "Brandy," a broken tin-opener, and a quantity of other travelers' debris.
His mother had been a Miss Trotter, of Chicago, and it was on her dowry that the Runnymedes contrived to make both ends meet.