Chillon


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Chillon

(ʃɪˈlɒn; French ʃijɔ̃)
n
(Named Buildings) a castle in W Switzerland, in Vaud at the E end of Lake Geneva
References in classic literature ?
But at the "Trois Couronnes," it must be added, there are other features that are much at variance with these suggestions: neat German waiters, who look like secretaries of legation; Russian princesses sitting in the garden; little Polish boys walking about held by the hand, with their governors; a view of the sunny crest of the Dent du Midi and the picturesque towers of the Castle of Chillon.
asked the young girl, pointing with her parasol to the far-gleaming walls of the Chateau de Chillon.
And Miss Miller pointed again at the Chateau de Chillon.
To prove that I believe it, I am going to take her to the Chateau de Chillon.
Is it literally true that she is going to the Chateau de Chillon with you?
Winterbourne's preference had been that they should be conveyed to Chillon in a carriage; but she expressed a lively wish to go in the little steamer; she declared that she had a passion for steamboats.
But he saw that she cared very little for feudal antiquities and that the dusky traditions of Chillon made but a slight impression upon her.
His companion, after this, ceased to pay any attention to the curiosities of Chillon or the beauties of the lake; she opened fire upon the mysterious charmer in Geneva whom she appeared to have instantly taken it for granted that he was hurrying back to see.
Costello that he had spent the afternoon at Chillon with Miss Daisy Miller.
I had always had a deep and reverent compassion for the sufferings of the "prisoner of Chillon," whose story Byron had told in such moving verse; so I took the steamer and made pilgrimage to the dungeons of the Castle of Chillon, to see the place where poor Bonnivard endured his dreary captivity three hundred years ago.
However much we may discount his sacrifice of his life in the cause of a foreign people, his love of political freedom and his hatred of tyranny were thoroughly and passionately sincere, as is repeatedly evident in such poems as the sonnet on 'Chillon,' 'The Prisoner of Chillon,' and the 'Ode on Venice.
They had been talking of Bonnivard, as they glided past Chillon, and of Rousseau, as they looked up at Clarens, where he wrote his Heloise.