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4th-century bc silver
Greek coin


also Chi·mae·ra  (kī-mîr′ə, kĭ-)
1. Greek Mythology A fire-breathing female monster usually represented as a composite of a lion, goat, and serpent.
2. An imaginary monster made up of grotesquely disparate parts.


also chi·mae·ra  (kī-mîr′ə, kĭ-)
a. An organism, organ, or part consisting of two or more tissues of different genetic composition, produced as a result of organ transplant, grafting, or genetic engineering.
b. A substance, such as an antibody, created from the proteins or genes of two different species.
2. An individual who has received a transplant of genetically and immunologically different tissue.
3. A fanciful mental illusion or fabrication.

[Middle English chimere, Chimera, from Old French, from Latin chimaera, from Greek khimaira, female goat, Chimera; see ghei- in Indo-European roots.]


(kaɪˈmɪərə; kɪ-) or


1. (Classical Myth & Legend) (often capital) Greek myth a fire-breathing monster with the head of a lion, body of a goat, and tail of a serpent
2. (Art Terms) a fabulous beast made up of parts taken from various animals
3. a wild and unrealistic dream or notion
4. (Genetics) biology an organism, esp a cultivated plant, consisting of at least two genetically different kinds of tissue as a result of mutation, grafting, etc
[C16: from Latin chimaera, from Greek khimaira she-goat, from khimaros he-goat]


or chi•mae•ra

(kɪˈmɪər ə, kaɪ-)

n., pl. -ras.
1. (often cap.) a monster of classical myth, commonly represented with a lion's head, a goat's body, and a serpent's tail.
2. any horrible or grotesque imaginary creature.
3. a fancy or dream.
4. an organism composed of two or more genetically distinct tissues.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin chimaera < Greek chímaira she-goat; akin to Old Norse gymbr, E gimmer ewe-lamb one year (i.e., one winter) old, Latin hiems winter (see hiemal)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chimera - (Greek mythology) fire-breathing female monster with a lion's head and a goat's body and a serpent's tailChimera - (Greek mythology) fire-breathing female monster with a lion's head and a goat's body and a serpent's tail; daughter of Typhon
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
mythical creature, mythical monster - a monster renowned in folklore and myth
2.chimera - a grotesque product of the imagination
imagery, imaging, mental imagery, imagination - the ability to form mental images of things or events; "he could still hear her in his imagination"


noun illusion, dream, fantasy, delusion, spectre, snare, hallucination, figment, ignis fatuus, will-o'-the-wisp He spent his life pursuing the chimera of perfect love.


A fantastic, impracticable plan or desire:


[kaɪˈmɪərə] Nquimera f


[kaɪˈmɪərə] n
(formal) (= idea) → chimère f
(= monster) → chimère f


nChimäre f; (fig)Schimäre f
References in classic literature ?
Unfortunately, a chimera bombinating in a vacuum is, nowadays, only too capable of producing secondary causes.
In other days, to seek the sources of the Nile--fontes Nili quoerere--was regarded as a mad endeavor, a chimera that could not be realized.
Both were allowed to plunge into a dark and narrow street, where no one dared to venture after them; so thoroughly did the mere chimera of Quasimodo gnashing his teeth bar the entrance.
To you, then, my goal is as much a chimera as perpetual motion?
With him Bellerophon caught and slew the fire-breathing Chimera.
An ideal image of the soul, like the composite creations of ancient mythology, such as the Chimera or Scylla or Cerberus, and there are many others in which two or more different natures are said to grow into one.
Hence those strange monsters in lace and embroidery, in silks and brocades, with vast wigs and hoops; which, under the name of lords and ladies, strut the stage, to the great delight of attorneys and their clerks in the pit, and of the citizens and their apprentices in the galleries; and which are no more to be found in real life than the centaur, the chimera, or any other creature of mere fiction.
The modern masters promise very little; they know that metals cannot be transmuted and that the elixir of life is a chimera but these philosophers, whose hands seem only made to dabble in dirt, and their eyes to pore over the microscope or crucible, have indeed performed miracles.
In the middle of these cogitations, apprehensions, and reflections, it came into my thoughts one day that all this might be a mere chimera of my own, and that this foot might be the print of my own foot, when I came on shore from my boat: this cheered me up a little, too, and I began to persuade myself it was all a delusion; that it was nothing else but my own foot; and why might I not come that way from the boat, as well as I was going that way to the boat?
These unhappy people were proposing schemes for persuading monarchs to choose favourites upon the score of their wisdom, capacity, and virtue; of teaching ministers to consult the public good; of rewarding merit, great abilities, eminent services; of instructing princes to know their true interest, by placing it on the same foundation with that of their people; of choosing for employments persons qualified to exercise them, with many other wild, impossible chimeras, that never entered before into the heart of man to conceive; and confirmed in me the old observation, "that there is nothing so extravagant and irrational, which some philosophers have not maintained for truth.
And there was Don Quixote observing all these strange proceedings attentively without uttering a word, and attributing the whole to chimeras of knight-errantry.
He preserved this opinion even after the feast, with the remnants of which he repaired his own long abstinence; but when in the evening he made his master's bed, the chimeras of Planchet faded away.