Chinese calendar


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Chinese calendar

n.
The traditional Chinese lunisolar calendar, based on 24 seasonal segments each about 15 days long that determine the timing of intercalary months. Each year is associated with a particular animal in a 12-year cycle.

Chi′nese cal′endar


n.
the former calendar of China, in which the year consisted of 12 lunar months with an intercalary month added seven times every 19 years, time being reckoned in 60-year cycles.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Chinese calendar dates back to China's first ruler, the Yellow King, though there is some disagreement about whether this is his 4,697th or his 4,698th year.
My parents are in most ways modern-day Americans, living in suburban Michigan, but they and many others of Chinese descent still follow the ancient Chinese calendar to determine their birthdays each year.
The New Year 2014, as per the Chinese calendar, will not be on 31 December but one month after - 31 January.
A week of celebrations, fun and games is under way in Newcastle to mark the most important event in the Chinese calendar.
The Chinese New Year is the biggest festival in the Chinese calendar.
STUDENTS have been enjoying a taste of the Orient to mark a highlight in the Chinese calendar.
According to the Chinese calendar, February 18 marks the start of the Year of the Pig, so there couldn't be a more appropriate time to look East.
The Chinese Almanac 2005, by Thomas Zhang and Ariel Frailich, ISBN 0-9732196-3-7, published by Ginseng Press, covers the Chinese calendar year (January 20, 2005 to January 20, 2006).
In the Chinese calendar the years are in a 12-year cycle.
This week around 230 people from across the Tees Valley gathered to celebrate the Moon Festival - the second most important date on the Chinese calendar.
Yes, I know it is February 1, not January 1, but today really is New Year's Day for followers of the Chinese calendar - the Lunar New Year.
Today is New Year's Day in the Chinese calendar, the day when we bid farewell to the wily snake and welcome the lively, boisterous, independent Horse.
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