Chinese tallow tree


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Chinese tallow tree

n.
An ornamental tree (Sapium sebiferum), native to China and Japan and naturalized in the southern United States and having a thick waxy seed coat that is used in making candles and soap. Also called vegetable tallow.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The tradition of tree plantation by visiting guests at the garden began on February 21, 1964, when Zhou Enlai, the first Premier of the People Republic of China, sowed a seed of the Chinese Tallow Tree.
Introduction, impact on native habitats, and management of a woody invader, the Chinese tallow tree, Sapium sebiferum (L.
The Chinese tallow tree (Triadica sebifera) is an invasive, non-native tree from Southeast Asia.
Chinese tallow tree is a noxious, invasive plant in the Southeastern United States.
Another spurge that changes color this time of year is Chinese tallow tree (Sapium sebiferum), one of the most desirable small- to medium-size ornamental trees.
Abiotic stress tolerance may play a role in the invasion and spread of Chinese tallow tree (Sapium sebiferum).
Until recently, Chinese tallow tree (Saplum sebiferum), an attractive small tree with outstanding fall color, was considered suitable for all residential landscapes.
The most common species in Monroe's Zoo was Chinese Tallow Tree accounting for 25% of the clumps while 23% of the stems counted were monkey grass.
Although no one species can be recommended for every location within California, the Chinese tallow tree deserves a special look.
Brazilian pepper -- Purple loosestrife -- Cattail -- Reed canarygrass -- Chinese Tallow Tree -- Swamp rose -- Cogongrass -- Russian-olive -- Giant reed -- Saltcedar -- Junglerice -- Smartweed -- Knapweeds -- Spartina -- Knotweed and Japanese -- Sumac knotweed -- Swamp morning glory or water -- Melaleuca spinach -- Phragmites -- Torpedo grass -- Willow
More than 150 CITGO employees and friends, along with hundreds of volunteers from Audubon Louisiana Nature Center and CRCL, donated 600 hours of labor to remove the invasive Chinese tallow tree from the Center's wetlands.

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