Chiricahua Apache


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Chiricahua Apache: Cochise, Geronimo, Chiricahua National Monument
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Chiricahua Apache - an Apache language
Apache - the language of the Apache
References in periodicals archive ?
VAST PILES OF MYSTERIOUS-looking, oversized rock formations await the hiker who reaches the place Chiricahua Apache Indians named "Land of Standing Up Rocks," a place that's better known today as Chiricahua National Monument.
The rest of the site looked like it probably dated to the 1870s Chiricahua Apache reservation period, so whafs this 18th-century flintlock doing in a site like that?
95) focuses on the Chiricahua Apache, lead by Geronimo and others, and looks to prove a military history of the Apaches free of the usual embellishments and myths.
Cochise: Firsthand Accounts of the Chiricahua Apache Chief
of Arizona) considers why so much fighting occurred between the US and various Indian tribes during the century following George Washington's presidency, and examines eight wars between the 1780s and 1877--the Ohio Valley War, the Red Stick War, the Arikara War, the Black Hawk War, the Minnesota Sioux War, the Cheyenne and Arapaho War, the Chiricahua Apache War, and the Nez Perce War--and the causes of each conflict (especially US expansion), the Native situation, events that created open warfare, and their similarities and differences.
GERONIMO'S SKULL Geronimo was a prominent Native American leader of the Chiricahua Apache who fought against Mexico and the United States during their expansion into tribal lands for several decades during the Apache Wars.
CORVALLIS - Allan Houser - his Chiricahua Apache surname was Haozous - died in 1994 at age 80 after creating a breathtaking collection of paintings and sculptures that range from modernist fluid abstracts to lifelike representations depicting varying aspects of Native American history and culture.
The Chiricahua Apache Prisoners of War: Fort Sill, 1894-1914.
Walking the trails, complete with interpretive waysides and a cemetery, visitors get a sense of the isolation that people must have felt living here--the Chiricahua Apache Indians, the settlers, and the soldiers who eventually secured this mountain pass.
Language classes previously organized by Darrow, who has been documenting his mother's Chiricahua Apache language since the late 1970s, were relatively poorly attended, and those few attendees mainly were older American Indians.
By fall of that year, he facilitated a relative peace by crafting a treaty with Cochise, a chief of the Chiricahua Apache tribe.
Special thanks to the author's good friend Terry Pickard, gifted Chiricahua Apache entertainer and educator now living in Ipswich, Suffolk, England.