Chogyal


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Chogyal

(ˈtʃɒɡjɑːl)
n
(Other Non-Christian Religions) the title of the ruler of Sikkim
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References in periodicals archive ?
Rinchen Chogyal from Kheng in Mongar is the owner of the only medical shop in Trashigang town.
However, there were no elections held in 41 chiwogs (electoral precincts) due to lack of candidates," admits Chogyal Dago Rigdzin, Chief Election Commissioner.
India signed an agreement with the King of Sikkim, Palden Thondup Namgyal, the 11th - and last - Chogyal of his people.
The situation mentioned is the riots against his unpopular rule which led Palden Thondup Namgyal, the Chogyal (ruler), to seek protection from India.
In 1253 Drogon Chogyal Phagpa, one of the five founders of the Sakyapa school of Tibetan Buddhism, the first vice--king of Tibet and spiritual advisor to Kublai Khan, ruler of the Mongo Empire, developed priest--patron concept featuring TibetoMongolian relations.
Acclaimed documentary filmmaker Jennifer Fox's award-winning film, My Reincarnation, was made over a 20-year period, during which she was given unparalleled entry into the private lives of high Tibetan Buddhist Master Chogyal Namkhai Norbu and his family.
practice), senior instructors Fabio Andrico and laura Evangelisiti demonstrate traditional Yantra Yoga as they personally learned it from Dzogchen Master Chogyal Namkhai Norbu.
In 1971, Palden Thondup Namgyal the chogyal (or king) of the tiny Himalayan kingdom of Sikkim and his American wife, Hope Cooke, commissioned Ray to make a documentary about the state.
Summary: Originally built to house the guests of the Chogyal royal family, The Nor-Khill boasts a fusion of traditional Sikkimese architecture and modern comfort.
Before Sikkim was merged into India, many Gurkha soldiers such as Captain Rolan Chhetri, Captain Lal Bahadur Limbu and Rifleman Basanta Kumar Chhetri along with the Magar rank and file had served the palace of King Chogyal.
The school was started as a separate branch of Enchey School, which was a monk school then in 1909 for teaching the art of statue making to monks at the time of Chogyal (King).
Yantra, or Trulkhor, is the Tibetan Buddhist equivalent to the Hindu Hathayoga, and though there are many variants in different tantric circles, Master Chogyal sets out the version he has taught in the West since the early 1970s.