chrematistics


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chrematistics

1. the study of wealth.
2. any theory of wealth as measured in money. — chrematistic, adj.
See also: Money
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He looks into economics and chrematistics, and gives an ontological analysis of Aristotle's science of economics and of economic and ethics, describes economics and politics to the economics of happiness, and gives Aristotle's take on causation and explanation and compares it to current social and economic science.
It is Hawkes's contention, pace Derrida, that the conceptual shift from Aristotelian "economics" defined as "practical management of the household," where money is "limited to its natural function as a medium of exchange," to chrematistics in which "money becomes an end in itself" generates the startling equivalence that "usury is to money what difference is to language" (10-11).
The limited ability to transfer identifiable molecular chrematistics between organism through genetic engineering does not constitute the demonstration of any comprehensive or reliable system for predicting all the significant effects of transposing genes.
Economics should not be confused with chrematistics, the science of making as much money as possible.
13) We could say that the rhetoric of currency slips from the Aristotelian notion of economy to chrematistics, from mere circulation to self-interest.
The ancient Greeks had their own pejorative term for money making, chrematistics.
The RITMO brand is positioned with its own chrematistics in the incredibly competitive watch world separating itself by highlighting it's partnerships with staples of the sports, entertainment and music industry.
A science of chrematistics would eventually arise to provide the warrant for this never-ending pursuit of more.
According to him, chrematistics is a technique subordinated to economics dealing with the acquisition of things used by oikonomike.
Aristotle argued that such chrematistics based upon gaining wealth through the exchange of money is shameful because it seeks the gaining of wealth for the person who practices it and not the mere use of goods: "For it is not in accordance with nature but involves men's taking things from one another.
On the contrary, for Aristotle, chrematistics is a technique subordinate to economics that deals with the acquisition of what is used by oikonomike (production, finance, and commerce).
In Aristotle's schema, oikonomike broadly corresponds to political economy, the practical science, and chrematistics to economics, the technical science.