Christ


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Christ 1

 (krīst)
Jesus as considered in Christianity to be the Messiah.

Christ 2

 (krīst)
n.
The Messiah, as foretold by the prophets of the Hebrew Scriptures. Often used with the.

[Middle English Crist, from Old English Crīst, from Latin Chrīstus, from Greek Khrīstos, from khrīstos, anointed, verbal adj. of khrīein, to anoint; see ghrēi- in Indo-European roots.]

Christ′like′ adj.
Christ′li·ness n.
Christ′ly adj.

Christ

(kraɪst)
n
1. (Theology) Jesus of Nazareth (Jesus Christ), regarded by Christians as fulfilling Old Testament prophecies of the Messiah
2. (Bible) the Messiah or anointed one of God as the subject of Old Testament prophecies
3. (Art Terms) an image or picture of Christ
interj
taboo slang an oath expressing annoyance, surprise, etc
[Old English Crīst, from Latin Chrīstus, from Greek khristos anointed one (from khriein to anoint), translating Hebrew māshīah Messiah]
ˈChristly adj

Christ

(kraɪst)

n.
1. Jesus of Nazareth, held by Christians to be the fulfillment of prophecies in the Old Testament regarding the coming of a Messiah.
2. (chiefly in versions of the New Testament) the Messiah prophesied in the Old Testament.
3. someone regarded as similar to Jesus of Nazareth.
[learned respelling of Middle English, Old English Crīst < Latin Chrīstus < Greek Chrīstós literally, anointed, translation of Hebrew māshīaḥ anointed, Messiah]
Christ′hood, n.
Christ′less, adj.
Christ′ly, Christ′like`, adj.

Christ


the 8th-century heretical doctrine that Christ in His human nature was the son of God only by adoption; that in His spiritual nature, however, He was truly God’s son. Also adoptianism. — adoptionist, n., adj.
a 4th-century doctrine, considered heretical by orthodox Christian-ity, that Christ was merely the noblest of men and, being of a different sub-stance, was not the son of God. Cf. heteroousianism, psilanthropism. — Arian, n., adj. — Arianistic, Arianistical, adj.
the teachings of Athanasius, 4th-century bishop of Alexandria, asserting that Christ is of the same substance as God; adopted by the Council of Nicea as orthodox doctrine. Also called homoousianism, homoiousianism. — Athanasian, n., adj.
the Calvinist doctrine of the separate existence of God the Son, derived from Calvin’s assertion that Christ took His person from God, but not His substance. — autotheist, n. — autotheistic, adj.
the doctrine that Christ will return to the world in a visible form and set up a kingdom to last 1000 years, after which the world will come to an end. — chiliast, n. — chiliastic, adj.
the branch of theology that studies the personality, attitudes, and life of Christ. — Christological, adj.
one or all of Christ’s appearances to men after the resurrection, as recorded in the Gospels.
the teaching of an early heretical sect asserting that Christ’s body was not human or material, but celestial in substance. — Docetic, adj.
a 5th-century doctrine that Christ had a dual nature, the divine and the human, united perfectly in Him, but not inextricably blended. Cf. Monophysitism. — Dyophysite, n. — Dyophysitic, adj.
the doctrine that Christ had two wills, the human and the divine. Cf. Monothelitism. Also Dyothetism. — Dyothelite, Dyothelete, n.
Monophysitism. — Eutychian, n.
a position in the 4th-century controversy over Christ’s nature, asserting that He and God were of different natures; Arianism. Also spelled heterousianism. — heteroousian, n., adj.
a position in the 4th-century controversy over Christ’s nature, asserting that He and God were of similar, but not the same, natures; semi-Arianism. Also homoeanism. — homoiousian, n., adj.
a position in the 4th-century controversy over Christ’s nature, asserting that He and God are of the same nature; Athanasianism. — homoousian, n., adj.
the theological doctrine that the body and blood of Christ are present in the bread and wine after they are consecrated.
the heretical theory of Julian, 6th-century bishop of Halicarnassus, who took the extreme Monophysite position that Christ’s human nature had been subsumed in and altered by the divine. — Julianist, n.
the theological concept that, through His incarnation, Christ humbled or emptied Himself and became a servant for man’s sake. — kenosis, kenoticist, n. — kenotic, adj.
sayings or maxims attributed to Christ but of which there is no written record or mention in the Gospels. See also wisdom.
1. the doctrine of Christ’s 1000-year kingdom.
2. a belief in the millennium; chiliasm. — millenarian, n., adj. — millenarist, n.
a doctrine that Christ will make a second Advent and that the prophecy in the book of Revelation will be fulfilled with an earthly millennium of peace and righteousness. Also called millenarianism, chiliasm. — millennialist, n.
a 5th-century heresy concerning the nature of Christ, asserting that He had only a divine nature or that the human and divine made one composite nature. Cf. Dyophysitism. — Monophysite, n., adj. — Monophysitic, Monophysitical, adj.
a heretical position of the 7th century that Christ’s human will had been superseded by the divine. Also Monothelism. — Monothelite, Monothelete, n. — Monothelitic, Monotheletic, adj.
a 5th-century heresy concerning Christ’s nature, asserting that the human and divine were in harmony but separate and that Mary should be considered the Mother of Christ, not of God. — Nestorian, n., adj.
a heretical, monophysitic concept of the 2nd and 3rd centuries that held that, in the Crucifixion, the Father suffered equally with the Son. — Patripassian, Patripassianist, n.
a 3rd-century heresy concerning the nature of Christ, denying the divine by asserting that Christ was inspired by God and was not a person in the Trinity. — Paulian, Paulianist, n.
a member of an early Christian sect that denied the reality of Christ’s body.
the doctrine that Christ was merely a human being. Cf. Arianism. — psilanthropist, n. — psilanthropic, adj.
the study of fabric artifacts, especially the supposed burial shroud of Christ. — sindonologist, n.
the doctrine of salvation through Jesus Christ. — soteriologic, soteriological, adj.
the condition of being, simultaneously, both god and man. Also theanthropology. — theanthropist, n. — theanthropic, adj.
the orthodox Christian belief that God exists as the Trinity of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. Cf. unitarianism. — trinitarian, n., adj.
the doctrines of those, including the Unitarian denomination, who hold that God exists only in one person. Cf. trinitarianism. — unitarian, n.,adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Christ - a teacher and prophet born in Bethlehem and active in NazarethChrist - a teacher and prophet born in Bethlehem and active in Nazareth; his life and sermons form the basis for Christianity (circa 4 BC - AD 29)
2.Christ - any expected delivererchrist - any expected deliverer    
rescuer, savior, saviour, deliverer - a person who rescues you from harm or danger

Christ

noun Jesus Christ, Our Lord, the Galilean, the Good Shepherd, the Nazarene This is the day which marks Christ's Last Supper with His disciples.
Translations
المَسيحالـمَسِيح
Kristus
Kristus
Kristo
Kristus
Krist
Krisztus
Jesús Kristur
キリスト
그리스도
Christus
Kristus
Kristus
Hristos
Kristus
CristoJesucristoKristus
Kristus
พระเยซูคริสต์
Hz.İsaİsa
Chúa Giê-su

Christ

[kraɪst]
A. NCristo m
B. EXCL Christ!¡hostia(s)!, ¡carajo! (LAm)

Christ

[ˈkraɪst] nle Christ m
the birth of Christ → la naissance du ChristChrist Child [ˈkraɪsttʃaɪld] n
the Christ Child → l'enfant m Jésus

Christ

nChristus m
interj (sl)Herrgott (inf)

Christ

[kraɪst] nCristo

Christ

(kraist) noun
Jesus.

Christ

الـمَسِيح Kristus Kristus Christus Χριστός Cristo Kristus Christ Krist Cristo キリスト 그리스도 Christus Kristus Chrystus Cristo Христос Kristus พระเยซูคริสต์ İsa Chúa Giê-su 耶稣基督
References in classic literature ?
As Amy pointed to the smiling Christ child on his Mother's knee, Mrs.
It is this--that everyone in the world is Christ and they are all crucified.
He read the chapters from Saint Matthew about the birth of Christ, and as we listened, it all seemed like something that had happened lately, and near at hand.
It was too far off for Santa Claus in Lithuania, but it was not too far for peace and good will to men, for the wonder-bearing vision of the Christ Child.
1] Edward Bouverie Pusey (1800-1882), champion of the orthodoxy of revealed religion, defender of the Oxford movement, and Regius professor of Hebrew and Canon of Christ Church, Oxford.
Why does it always crucify Christ and excommunicate Copernicus and Luther, and pronounce Washington and Franklin rebels?
That drop was falling when the Pyramids were new; when Troy fell; when the foundations of Rome were laid when Christ was crucified; when the Conqueror created the British empire; when Columbus sailed; when the massacre at Lexington was "news.
with all his noble powers and sublime aspirations, how like a brute was he treated, even by those professing to have the same mind in them that was in Christ Jesus
Read the New Testament, and observe what Christ says, and how He acts; make His word your rule, and His conduct your example.
God rest you, merry gentlemen, Let nothing you dismay, For Jesus Christ our Savior Was born on Christmas-day.
He loved to kneel down on the cold marble pavement and watch the priest, in his stiff flowered dalmatic, slowly and with white hands moving aside the veil of the tabernacle, or raising aloft the jewelled, lantern-shaped monstrance with that pallid wafer that at times, one would fain think, is indeed the "panis caelestis," the bread of angels, or, robed in the garments of the Passion of Christ, breaking the Host into the chalice and smiting his breast for his sins.
Whatever we had suffered hitherto, was nothing to the difficulties we were now entering upon, and which God had decreed us to undergo for the sake of Jesus Christ.