Christianism

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Related to Christianist: Christianism

Christianism

the religious tenets held by all Christians.
See also: Christianity
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At a time in America's history when the administration is anti-immigrant, racist, misogynist, ableist, Christianist, classist, homophobic, and transphobic; the Gaea Goddess Gathering sees transgender women as women.
12) In company with other foundationalist religiously focused thinkers, such as ideologues of rising Christianist political movements in North America since the 1990s, Qutb located the downfall of human society in what he saw as the quintessential modern and secular belief that human beings can define values and create legislative structures for collective life without recourse to divine omnipotence.
Like too many American believers, they are more Christianist than Christian--that is, they adhere to an ideology that equates the Christian Faith with a political agenda, in this case the GOP platform.
As the oldest and most intractable iteration, Barbary corsairs, with their abduction, ransoming and enslavement of European voyagers, were a popular subject of Christianist invective for centuries prior to the Romantic period.
As columnist Michelle Goldberg explained, Barton is at the very least a pseudo-historian, one who uses dubious methods and interpretations to push an extreme, Christianist narrative of American history.
THIS collection was gifted the bright light of publicity by a Christianist group which forced Waterstones to cancel a reading.
SUCH NONCOMMITTAL stewardship is ultimately just as indifferent to creation as is a purely anthropocentric and Christianist dominionism.
Following the Christianist model of Chateaubriand's Atala, Dom Antonio, besieged by the Aimore and undermined by Loredano and his henchmen, entrusted his daughter to Peri only on condition that he convert to Christianity.
the religious has swamped the political, and we are now drowning in the fetid waters of moral rectitude and self-righteousness brought to us by radical fundamentalist Islamists, Christianists, Judaists, and Hinduists.
In Australia, Christianists form a powerful, secretive alliance within the Coalition, an arch-conservative faction calling themselves the United Family Congress.
Rudolph Giuliani, who has generally supported gay equality and famously lived with a gay couple when one of his marriages was failing, promised the Christianists in 2007 that, if elected, he would appoint right-wing judges like the preposterous Clarence Thomas.
Nevertheless, Delfattore ultimately dismisses the case against equal access as the work of too-literal separationists, on the one side, and on the other disgruntled Christianists who fail in "fully appreciat[ing] the increasing diversity of America's present-day blend of religious heritages, [which] crie[s] out for individualized worship rather than for group prayer determined by the school" (312).