Christie


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Related to Christie: Agatha Christie

chris·tie

or chris·ty  (krĭs′tē)
n. pl. chris·ties
A ski turn or stop performed by shifting most of the weight onto the downhill ski and keeping the skis parallel.

[Short for christiania.]

Christie

(ˈkrɪstɪ)
n
1. (Biography) Dame Agatha (Mary Clarissa). 1890–1976, British author of detective stories, many featuring Hercule Poirot, and several plays, including The Mousetrap (1952)
2. (Biography) John (Reginald Halliday). 1898–1953, British murderer. His trial influenced legislation regarding the death penalty after he was found guilty of a murder for which Timothy Evans had been hanged
3. (Biography) Linford (ˈlɪnfəd). born 1960, British athlete: Commonwealth (1990), Olympic (1992), World (1993), and European (1994) 100 metres gold medallist
4. (Biography) William (Lincoln). born 1944, French harpsichord player, organist, and conductor, born in the US; founder (1979) and director of the early-music group Les Arts Florissants

Chris•tie

or Chris•ty

(ˈkrɪs ti)

n., pl. -ties.
(sometimes l.c.) any of several skiing turns for changing direction, decreasing speed, or stopping, esp. a turn in which the body is swung around with the skis kept parallel.
[1915–20; shortening of Christiania; see -ie]

Chris•tie

(ˈkrɪs ti)

n.
Agatha, 1891–1976, English writer of detective novels.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Christie - prolific English writer of detective stories (1890-1976)Christie - prolific English writer of detective stories (1890-1976)
References in classic literature ?
We can't stop HERE, papa," said Christie Carr decidedly, with a shake of her pretty head.
Jessie Carr's half-frightened smile took refuge in the trembling shadows of her dark lashes; Christie Carr stiffened slightly, and looked straight before her.
The only thing on wheels in the camp is a mule wagon, and the mules are packin' gravel from the river this afternoon," explained Dick Mattingly apologetically to Christie, "or we'd have toted--I mean carried--you and your baggage up to the shant--the--your house.
In spite of her cold indignation, and the fact that she could understand only a part of Mattingly's speech, Christie comprehended enough to make her lift her clear eyes to the speaker, as she replied freezingly that she feared she would not trouble them long with her company.
With ready tact, and before Christie could reply, Maryland Joe had put down the trunk and changed hands with his brother.
I imagine it would be very difficult to carry a piano over those mountains," said Christie laughingly, to avoid the collateral of the banjo.
Neither Christie nor Jessie could for a moment understand the delicacy which kept these young men from accompanying them into the room they had but a few moments before decorated and arranged with their own hands, and it was not until they turned to thank their strange entertainers that they found that they were gone.
It's so, Christie," she said laughingly-- "three flour-sacks apiece; but I'm jealous: yours are all marked
said Christie, slowly removing her bonnet in the same resigned way.
I am not a hired man, or a workman, Christie," said her father sharply.
Really, now, Christie," said Jessie confidentially, when they were alone, and Christie had begun to unpack her trunk, and to mechanically put her things away, "they're not so bad.
said Christie, forcing herself to smile at her sister's animation.