Christine de Pisan


Also found in: Encyclopedia.

Chris·tine de Pi·zan

or Chris·tine de Pi·san  (krēs-tēn′ də pē-zäN) c. 1364-c. 1431.
French writer noted for her numerous poems of courtly love, a biography of Charles V of France (1404), and several polemical works in defense of womankind, such as Le Livre de la cité des dames (1405).

Christine de Pisan

(French krɪstin də pizɑ̃)
n
(Biography) ?1364–?1430, French poet and prose writer, born in Venice. Her works include ballads, rondeaux, lays, and a biography of Charles V of France
References in periodicals archive ?
As early as 1838, Raimond Thomassy demonstrated in his Essai sur les ecrits politiques de Christine de Pisan that Christine de Pizan's writings had a political and not simply literary dimension.
Klanac used excerpts from medieval French poet Christine de Pisan, said to be Europe's first professional writer.
She begins with the noted author Christine de Pisan, known more in England for her wisdom books than her feminist treatises.
Philippe de Mezieres, Eustache Deschamps, Honore Bovet, and Christine de Pisan are the poets.
AD Of all the books that interest me, or to mention one in particular, I'm currently reading Rabelais and Christine de Pisan.
In contrast to these metacritical authors, as Lorna Jane Abray's essay shows, Christine de Pisan appropriates Troy's fall quite pointedly as an exemplum; over the course of her career, Christine repeatedly evokes Hector and his fate as a warning to the powerful dukes of her own time, whose lack of self-control might otherwise lead to "a kingdom-ruining holocaust comparable to the fiery destruction" of Troy.
and a few citations to Christine de Pisan scattered throughout, this is primarily a volume about maidens in medieval England and the views of medieval English writers on them.
It is not their bodies but their upbringing and poor education that explain why women behave in certain ways, Christine de Pisan posited around 1400 in response to misogynous comments by contemporaries.
Mueller's argument that Lanyer "uses her portrayals of Christ and actual good women to trace the impact of feminine or feminized virtue on the masculine side of a range of standing dichotomies that mark conceptions of social and political relations" (117) demonstrates a poet as vigorous and aware in her challenge to misogyny as Christine de Pisan two hundred years earlier.