karyotype

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Related to Chromosome morphology: Karyogram

kar·y·o·type

 (kăr′ē-ə-tīp′)
n.
1. The characterization of the chromosomal complement of an individual or a species, including number, form, and size of the chromosomes.
2. A photomicrograph of chromosomes arranged according to a standard classification.
tr.v. kar·y·o·typed, kar·y·o·typ·ing, kar·y·o·types
To classify and array (the chromosome complement of an organism or a species) according to the arrangement, number, size, shape, or other characteristics of the chromosomes.

kar′y·o·typ′ic (-tĭp′ĭk), kar′y·o·typ′i·cal adj.

karyotype

(ˈkærɪəˌtaɪp)
n
(Biology) the appearance of the chromosomes in a somatic cell of an individual or species, with reference to their number, size, shape, etc
vb (tr)
(Biology) to determine the karyotype of (a cell)
karyotypic, ˌkaryoˈtypical adj

kar•y•o•type

(ˈkær i əˌtaɪp)

n.
the chromosomes of a cell, usu. displayed as a systematized arrangement of chromosome pairs in descending order of size.
[1925–30]
kar`y•o•typ′i•cal, adj.

kar·y·o·type

(kăr′ē-ə-tīp′)
The number and shape of chromosomes in the nucleus of a cell. Scientists prepare karyotypes by staining cell nuclei, placing them on slides, and then photographing them through a microscope. Images of the chromosomes can then be grouped by size using a computer. Karyotypes are used to study the genetic makeup of an individual.

karyotype

the aggregate of morphological characteristics of the chromosomes in a cell. — karyotypic, karyotypical, adj.
See also: Cells

karyotype


Past participle: karyotyped
Gerund: karyotyping

Imperative
karyotype
karyotype
Present
I karyotype
you karyotype
he/she/it karyotypes
we karyotype
you karyotype
they karyotype
Preterite
I karyotyped
you karyotyped
he/she/it karyotyped
we karyotyped
you karyotyped
they karyotyped
Present Continuous
I am karyotyping
you are karyotyping
he/she/it is karyotyping
we are karyotyping
you are karyotyping
they are karyotyping
Present Perfect
I have karyotyped
you have karyotyped
he/she/it has karyotyped
we have karyotyped
you have karyotyped
they have karyotyped
Past Continuous
I was karyotyping
you were karyotyping
he/she/it was karyotyping
we were karyotyping
you were karyotyping
they were karyotyping
Past Perfect
I had karyotyped
you had karyotyped
he/she/it had karyotyped
we had karyotyped
you had karyotyped
they had karyotyped
Future
I will karyotype
you will karyotype
he/she/it will karyotype
we will karyotype
you will karyotype
they will karyotype
Future Perfect
I will have karyotyped
you will have karyotyped
he/she/it will have karyotyped
we will have karyotyped
you will have karyotyped
they will have karyotyped
Future Continuous
I will be karyotyping
you will be karyotyping
he/she/it will be karyotyping
we will be karyotyping
you will be karyotyping
they will be karyotyping
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been karyotyping
you have been karyotyping
he/she/it has been karyotyping
we have been karyotyping
you have been karyotyping
they have been karyotyping
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been karyotyping
you will have been karyotyping
he/she/it will have been karyotyping
we will have been karyotyping
you will have been karyotyping
they will have been karyotyping
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been karyotyping
you had been karyotyping
he/she/it had been karyotyping
we had been karyotyping
you had been karyotyping
they had been karyotyping
Conditional
I would karyotype
you would karyotype
he/she/it would karyotype
we would karyotype
you would karyotype
they would karyotype
Past Conditional
I would have karyotyped
you would have karyotyped
he/she/it would have karyotyped
we would have karyotyped
you would have karyotyped
they would have karyotyped
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.karyotype - the appearance of the chromosomal makeup of a somatic cell in an individual or species (including the number and arrangement and size and structure of the chromosomes)
physical composition, composition, make-up, makeup, constitution - the way in which someone or something is composed
Translations

kar·y·o·type

n. cariotipo, cromosoma característico de un individuo o de una especie.

karyotype

n cariotipo
References in periodicals archive ?
Focusing on chromosomal knobs and Bs, Kato and collaborators undertook a formal study of chromosome morphology and number among the maize races (Kato, 1976).
In spite of the uniform number of chromosomes, individual populations may differ in chromosome morphology and these differences are mainly manifested in the varying proportion of uni-armed to bi-armed autosomes, which can be quantified in the number of autosomal arms (NFa).
The chromosomal aberrations induced by radiation can be seen in changes in the number of chromosomes, and/or aberrant chromosome morphology and quantity of sex chromatin bodies (Tothova & Marec 2001; Carpenter et al.
The present proposal tests the active chromosome hypothesis by investigating how chromosome morphology influences the fidelity of mitosis.
2004) reported that although most of Capsicum species are 2n = 24 and present high similarity in chromosome morphology, the genus possesses high intra- and interspecific karyotypic variability.
Effect of Alkaloid-Free and Alkaloid-Rich preparations from Uncaria tomentosa bark on mitotic activity and chromosome morphology evaluated by Allium Test.
Present population shares 2n number of 44 with the stocks of the species present in India and Thailand, yet is different from two other stocks in respect of chromosome morphology (Indian: 40 metacentric + 4 telocentric; Thailand: 4 metacentric + 4 submetacentric + 36 telocentric), suggesting intraspecific differences probably caused by isolation.
On the other hand, some submicroscopic alterations cannot be visualized because of poor chromosome morphology and lower resolution of G banding, These limitations lead to the assessment of genetically altered cells as normal cells.
Even though Vitaceae is not considered a large family, less than 7% of its 945 species have the chromosome number determined and less than 1% of these species have some information about chromosome morphology (GOLDBLATT; JOHNSON, 2006).