pancreatitis

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pan·cre·a·ti·tis

 (păng′krē-ə-tī′tĭs, păn′-)
n.
Inflammation of the pancreas.

pancreatitis

(ˌpæŋkrɪəˈtaɪtɪs)
n
(Pathology) inflammation of the pancreas

pan•cre•a•ti•tis

(ˌpæn kri əˈtaɪ tɪs, ˌpæŋ-)

n.
inflammation of the pancreas.
[1835–45; < Greek pankreat-, s. of pánkreas pancreas + -itis]

pancreatitis

Inflammation of the pancreas, caused by gallstones, overconsumption of alcohol, or a viral infection.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pancreatitis - inflammation of the pancreas; usually marked by abdominal pain
inflammation, redness, rubor - a response of body tissues to injury or irritation; characterized by pain and swelling and redness and heat
Translations

pan·cre·a·ti·tis

n. pancreatitis, infl. del páncreas;
acute ______ aguda;
hemorrhagic, acute ______ hemorrágica aguda.

pancreatitis

n pancreatitis f
References in periodicals archive ?
Chronic pancreatitis usually follows many years of alcohol abuse.
A post-mortem later revealed he did not have a tumour but a swollen pancreas, or chronic pancreatitis.
Toby Jenkins, who suffered from chronic pancreatitis, experienced lengthy periods of such excruciating discomfort that he was left incapacitated.
But some develop chronic pancreatitis, which is marked by deep pain and gradual destruction of the organ.
Little is known about the cause of such disastrous diseases as chronic pancreatitis, with as many as 40% of adult cases labeled "idiopathic," meaning of unknown origin.
Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease that can lead to digestive problems, chronic pain and eventual destruction of the pancreas, as well as the possible development of diabetes.
In the clinical setting, the need exists to discriminate between chronic pancreatitis and carcinoma of the exocrine pancreas.
The fact that only a small percentage of heavy alcoholics develop chronic pancreatitis has led to the search for precipitating factors of the disease.
The most common cause is chronic pancreatitis from alcohol dependence, less commonly from cystic fibrosis, acute pancreatitis and post-pancreatic surgery.
HP is most commonly caused by a rupture of an aneurysm of the splenic artery associated with acute or chronic pancreatitis.
A number of ductal lesions must be considered in the differential diagnosis, including normal ductal cells, reactive changes in ductal cells due to acute and chronic pancreatitis, autoimmune pancreatitis, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, benign pancreatic ductal tumors, and ductal adenocarcinoma.

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