chronicle

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chron·i·cle

 (krŏn′ĭ-kəl)
n.
1. An extended account in prose or verse of historical events, sometimes including legendary material, presented in chronological order and without authorial interpretation or comment.
2. A detailed narrative record or report.
3. Chronicles(used with a sing. verb) See Table at Bible.
tr.v. chron·i·cled, chron·i·cling, chron·i·cles
To record in or in the form of a historical record.

[Middle English cronicle, from Anglo-Norman, alteration of Old French cronique, from Latin chronica, from Greek khronika (biblia), chronological (books), annals, neuter pl. of khronikos, of time; see chronic.]

chron′i·cler (-klər) n.

chronicle

(ˈkrɒnɪkəl)
n
a record or register of events in chronological order
vb
(tr) to record in or as if in a chronicle
[C14: from Anglo-French cronicle, via Latin chronica (pl), from Greek khronika annals, from khronikos relating to time; see chronic]
ˈchronicler n

chron•i•cle

(ˈkrɒn ɪ kəl)

n., v. -cled, -cling. n.
1. a chronological record of events; a history.
v.t.
2. to record in or as if in a chronicle.
[1275–1325; Middle English cronicle < Anglo-French, alter. of Old French cronique < Medieval Latin cronica (feminine singular), Latin chronica (neuter pl.) < Greek chroniká annals, chronology; see chronic]
chron′i•cler, n.

chronicle


Past participle: chronicled
Gerund: chronicling

Imperative
chronicle
chronicle
Present
I chronicle
you chronicle
he/she/it chronicles
we chronicle
you chronicle
they chronicle
Preterite
I chronicled
you chronicled
he/she/it chronicled
we chronicled
you chronicled
they chronicled
Present Continuous
I am chronicling
you are chronicling
he/she/it is chronicling
we are chronicling
you are chronicling
they are chronicling
Present Perfect
I have chronicled
you have chronicled
he/she/it has chronicled
we have chronicled
you have chronicled
they have chronicled
Past Continuous
I was chronicling
you were chronicling
he/she/it was chronicling
we were chronicling
you were chronicling
they were chronicling
Past Perfect
I had chronicled
you had chronicled
he/she/it had chronicled
we had chronicled
you had chronicled
they had chronicled
Future
I will chronicle
you will chronicle
he/she/it will chronicle
we will chronicle
you will chronicle
they will chronicle
Future Perfect
I will have chronicled
you will have chronicled
he/she/it will have chronicled
we will have chronicled
you will have chronicled
they will have chronicled
Future Continuous
I will be chronicling
you will be chronicling
he/she/it will be chronicling
we will be chronicling
you will be chronicling
they will be chronicling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been chronicling
you have been chronicling
he/she/it has been chronicling
we have been chronicling
you have been chronicling
they have been chronicling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been chronicling
you will have been chronicling
he/she/it will have been chronicling
we will have been chronicling
you will have been chronicling
they will have been chronicling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been chronicling
you had been chronicling
he/she/it had been chronicling
we had been chronicling
you had been chronicling
they had been chronicling
Conditional
I would chronicle
you would chronicle
he/she/it would chronicle
we would chronicle
you would chronicle
they would chronicle
Past Conditional
I would have chronicled
you would have chronicled
he/she/it would have chronicled
we would have chronicled
you would have chronicled
they would have chronicled

chronicle

A chronological account of events.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chronicle - a record or narrative description of past eventschronicle - a record or narrative description of past events; "a history of France"; "he gave an inaccurate account of the plot to kill the president"; "the story of exposure to lead"
history - the discipline that records and interprets past events involving human beings; "he teaches Medieval history"; "history takes the long view"
ancient history - a history of the ancient world
etymology - a history of a word
case history - detailed record of the background of a person or group under study or treatment
historical document, historical paper, historical record - writing having historical value (as opposed to fiction or myth etc.)
chronological record, annals - a chronological account of events in successive years
biography, life history, life story, life - an account of the series of events making up a person's life
record - anything (such as a document or a phonograph record or a photograph) providing permanent evidence of or information about past events; "the film provided a valuable record of stage techniques"
recital - a detailed account or description of something; "he was forced to listen to a recital of his many shortcomings"
Verb1.chronicle - record in chronological order; make a historical record
record, enter, put down - make a record of; set down in permanent form

chronicle

verb
1. record, tell, report, enter, relate, register, recount, set down, narrate, put on record The rise of collectivism in Britain has been chronicled by several historians.
noun
1. record, story, history, account, register, journal, diary, narrative, annals this vast chronicle of Napoleonic times

chronicle

noun
1. A chronological record of past events:
2. A recounting of past events:
Translations
سِجِل زَمَني للأحْداثيُسَجِّلُ الأحداث زَمَنِيّا
kronikazaznamenat do kroniky
årbogkrønikenedskriveoptegne
annállfæra í annál
kronikakronikininkasrašyti kroniką
hronikarakstīt hroniku
kronikapísať do kroniky
tarihsel kayda geçirmekvakayinamevakayinameye yazmak

chronicle

[ˈkrɒnɪkl]
A. Ncrónica f
Chronicles (Bible) → Crónicas fpl
B. VT (= recount) → hacer una crónica de

chronicle

[ˈkrɒnɪkəl]
n (= account) → chronique f
vt [+ events] → faire la chronique dechronic wasting disease nmaladie f du dépérissement chronique

chronicle

nChronik f; Chronicles pl (Bibl) → Bücher plder Chronik
vtaufzeichnen; historic events alsoeine Chronik (+gen)verfassen

chronicle

[ˈkrɒnɪkl] ncronaca

chronicle

(ˈkronikl) noun
a record of (especially historical) events in order of time.
verb
to make such a record.
ˈchronicler noun
References in classic literature ?
For they are the public chroniclers of such inquiries by the line; and he is not superior to the universal human infirmity, but hopes to read in print what "Mooney, the active and intelligent beadle of the district," said and did and even aspires to see the name of Mooney as familiarly and patronizingly mentioned as the name of the hangman is, according to the latest examples.
But in the Crusades we already see an event occupying its definite place in history and without which we cannot imagine the modern history of Europe, though to the chroniclers of the Crusades that event appeared as merely due to the will of certain people.
Some of these chroniclers were mere painstaking men who noted facts and dates with care.
The medieval chroniclers were mostly mere annalists, brief mechanical recorders of external events, and the few more philosophic historians of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries do not attain the first rank.
There never was a race of people who so completely gave the lie to history as these giants, or whom all the chroniclers have so cruelly libelled.
It is the fate of all authors or chroniclers to create imaginary friends, and lose them in the course of art.
The whale has no famous author, and whaling no famous chronicler, you will say.
And thou, O sage magician, whoever thou art, to whom it shall fall to be the chronicler of this wondrous history, forget not, I entreat thee, my good Rocinante, the constant companion of my ways and wanderings.
Plato was not, like Xenophon, a chronicler of facts; he does not appear in any of his writings to have aimed at literal accuracy.
Would you like to know the opinion of a chronicler of the fourteenth century?
We have hinted that by the side of these views of the leveling and simplifying minister, which belong to history, the chronicler is forced to recognize the lesser motives of the amorous man and jealous rival.
Figueroa, the chronicler of Mendanna's voyage, says, that on the morning the land was descried, when the Spaniards drew near the shore, there sallied forth, in rude progression, about seventy canoes, and at the same time many of the inhabitants (females I presume) made towards the ships by swimming.