Chu Hsi


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Chu Hsi: Chu Xi

Chu Hsi

(ˈdʒu ˈʃi)
n.
1130–1200, Chinese philosopher.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
As an example of an alternative perspective, we may point to Ching, who was an expert on Neo-Confucian thought and wrote an entire book on The Religious Thought of Chu Hsi.
Chu Hsi and Thomas Aquinas on the Foundations of Moral Self-Cultivation.
It might seem coincidental that his only mention of Wei P0-yang consists of a poem quoted from a commentary by Chu Hsi (p.
Chu Hsi (1130-1200) Most influential Chinese philosopher.
Her books are easy to read and reveal a deep knowledge of such well-known classic writers as Manzoni, George Sand, and Chu Hsi, to mention hut three.
Las disposiciones del Observatorio fueron flor de un dia: pocos anos mas tarde, el almanaque volvio a incluir pronosticos matrimoniales y adivinacion geomantica, remplazo los mapas meteorologicos por el esquema de "los 9 dragones que controlan las lluvias" y reinstalo los aforismos de Chu Hsi, erradicados porque el Kuomintang sospechaba que ese filosofo simpatizaba con la politica de los emperadores.
This is examined through a history of Confucianism and Neo-Confucianism of the Sung dynasty (960-1279), especially that of Chu Hsi (1120-1200), the chief synthesizer of that newer philosophy.
Chu Hsi and Wang Yang-Ming can illuminate the contrast between realism and idealism.
The Sung dynasty witnessed a great Confucian revival under the leadership of Chu Hsi and his school.
Master Chu Hsi brought Confucianism into Quemoy, which made Quemoy always the center of Confucianism.
This was how Chu Hsi established what he called Tao-tung (the orthodox tradition of the Way), which showed a dynamic understanding of the Way that has captured unity in diversity, or li-i-fen-shu (one principle, many manifestations), if his own terminology is preferred.
While Lo criticized his contemporary, Wang Yang-ming (1472-1529), and even on occasion the orthodox masters of the Sung era (9601279), Ch'eng I (1033-1107) and Chu Hsi (1130-1200), for their "incompleteness" or exaggerations," his more basic aim or deeper impulse seems to have been reconciliative or syncretic.