Chuang Tzu


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Chuang Tzu

 (chwäng′ dzŭ′) also Zhuang·zi (jwäng′dzŭ′) c. 369-286 bc.
Chinese Taoist philosopher who advocated a skeptical approach to knowledge and a willing acceptance of change as a means of unifying oneself with the Tao.
References in classic literature ?
And while I pour and sip my Scotch, I remember another Chinese philosopher, Chuang Tzu, who, four centuries before Christ, challenged this dreamland of the world, saying: "How then do I know but that the dead repent of having previously clung to life?
Once upon a time, I, Chuang Tzu, dreamt I was a butterfly, fluttering hither and thither, to all intents and purposes a butterfly.
Featured are over 100 felicitous selections from Chuang Tzu, Lao Tzu, Li Po, Confucius, and many others including: "The one who knows does not speak.
After the legendary Lao Tzu, the most influential figure in Taoism is the historical Chuang Tzu, or Chuang Chou, (365-286), who lived in the feudal state of Sung in southern China during the Warring States period.
But if Dante is right and I am wrong, I hope to land in his First Circle of Hell along with Buddha, Socrates, Chuang Tzu, and other freethinkers.
Shao Peiren & Yao Jinyun, "On Recipient in Communication: The Receiving Subjectivity of Chuang Tzu, Hui-neng and Wang Yangming," Journalism & Communication, No.
Another important source for the study of interality is "The Secret of Caring for Life" ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]), which is the third chapter of The Complete Works of Chuang Tzu.
Woodcock's knowledge of the major progenitors of Taoism, Lao Tzu and Chuang Tzu, came from two sources: the thought of Herbert Read and the writings of Oscar Wilde.
It is widely known that he was familiar with the work of the Zhuangzi (365-290 AC) since his teenage years through Herbert Allen Giles's Chuang Tzu, Mystic, Moralist, And Social Reformer (1889), a book he had acquired in Geneva, and to which refers to as his introduction to Oriental literatures: "Hacia 1916 resolvi entregarme al estudio de las literaturas orientales.
The same mood can be found in Chuang Tzu for whom one ought to consider what each discourse gives from its own view-point, (16) and understand the extent to which each of them is worth considering in its own right.
Linking a reading of the Chinese Classics, and in particular the Chuang Tzu, with the prophetic writings of the Hebrew Bible, especially through the work of the Christian monk Thomas Merton, this essay will seek commonalities that are best explored not through the work of Christian theologians, but here through the thinking of contemporary European radicals, above all Zizek, leading us to take more seriously the "weak philosophy" proposed by Vattimo as the key to the return to thinking theologically.
Writing 2,300 years ago, the foundational Taoist thinker Chuang Tzu wondered at the wisdom of a man who spends his life "sweating and laboring to the end of his days and never seeing his accomplishment, merely exhausting himself and never knowing where to look for rest.