Churban


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Churban

(xʊːrˈbɑn; Yiddish ˈxʊːrbən) or

Hurban

n
1. (Judaism) the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem, first by the Babylonians in 587 bc and again by the Romans in 70 ad
2. (Historical Terms) another name for holocaust2
[literally: destruction]
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Berth occupancy remained at the Port at 63% on Sunday where a total of ten ships namely, Prosper, MSC Meava, MSC Valencia, Churban Sea, Star Planet White Purl, Maran Gas Asciepius, Snow Plops, Arpeggio and Pavino Spirit are currently occupying berths to load/offload Containers, Coal, Soya bean seeds, LNG, LPG, Chemicals, Palm oil and Furance respectively during last 24 hours.
Heschel's thought on the Shoah deals more with the preparatory oratory of evil speech, defamation, and propaganda than the catastrophic churban itself.
One might like to see the original Hebrew of this speech to see if Begin in fact used the word Holocaust in this metaphorical form, of if he used the more common pre-war Yiddish term, churban, meaning destruction or historical catastrophe.
When in the normal course of history a traumatic break occurs, this break was termed by the rabbis churban bayit--destruction of the house--(meaning the Temple).
Tarpat, Feige astutely suggests, is "the Hebronian holocaust," and the term churban (destruction) is applied to both catastrophes.
In contrast, White opposes his own view: "I do not think that the Holocaust, final Solution, Churban, or German genocide of the Jews is any more unrepresentable than any other event in human history" (1992, 52).
Testimony, Tensions and Tikkun examines the dynamics of Shoah and the response to the churban in a post-Auschwitz world.