canon law

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Related to Church law: canon law

canon law

n.
The body of rules governing the faith and practice of members of a religious denomination, especially a Christian church.

canon law

n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) the law governing the affairs of a Christian Church, esp the law created or recognized by papal authority in the Roman Catholic Church. See Corpus Juris Canonici, Codex Juris Canonici

can′on law′


n.
the body of codified ecclesiastical law governing a church.
[1300–50]

canon law

The body of laws governing the affairs of a Christian church.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.canon law - the body of codified laws governing the affairs of a Christian church
diriment impediment - (canon law) an impediment that invalidates a marriage (such as the existence of a prior marriage)
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Translations

canon law

n (Eccl) → Kanon m, → kanonisches Recht

canon law

n (Rel) → diritto canonico
References in periodicals archive ?
The word "privilege" means special permission for something not generally envisioned by church law.
If it's known that you are already guilty, then you will be harboring criminals, which is not only against Church law but also against civil law,' Cruz said.
The change to Church law was approved at a General Synod meeting in London, rubber-stamping backing given in July.
I would like to get my credentials back,'' said Schaefer, who will appear before a church panel in Baltimore this week to argue that his punishment was illegal under church law.
Marriage canon commission members will carry out a broad consultation about changing the church law to allow same-sex marriage.
A two-day church trial found Schaefer guilty of violating church law by performing the 2007 same-sex wedding of his son.
We are not saying that the Church cannot deal with sanctions, but purely Church law can never use sin as a punishment.
The case was filed in 2007 on behalf of a retired church law professor, Hartmut Zapp.
Members of the General Synod, the Church's national assembly, rejected attempts to formalise arrangements in church law for the vetting of divorced and remarried candidates for bishops' posts.
In Church law and civil law the marriage must be consummated and made legal by the physical union of the two bodies.
The Church's grip on Christians' personal lives will likely only increase with a bill before Egypt's parliament that would bar civil judges from making rulings that contradict church law in personal status cases involving Christians.
In an unexpected move, the Vatican also codified the "attempted ordination of a woman" to the priesthood as one of the most serious crimes against church law