Churchillian


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Churchill

, Sir Winston Leonard Spencer 1874-1965.
British politician and writer. As prime minister (1940-1945 and 1951-1955) he led Great Britain through World War II. Churchill published several works, including The Second World War (1948-1953), and won the 1953 Nobel Prize for literature.

Chur·chill′i·an (chûr-chĭl′ē-ən) adj.

Churchillian

(tʃəˈtʃɪlɪən)
adj
relating to, typical of or reminiscent of Winston Churchill
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.Churchillian - of or relating to or suggestive of Winston Churchill
References in periodicals archive ?
Anyone wishing to sit in Parliament and send our troops to war with Churchillian gravitas and jingoist slogans should first experience serving on the frontline in whatever theatre of conflict in which we are involved.
Someone who will deliver the Churchillian speeches, make you take your pain medicine over 10 games, make sure you're disciplined and up for the scrap.
This brings me to Michael Noonan, who my Blue Shirt friends now assure me is becoming Churchillian in pose.
BRYAN Robson revealed Albion's Great Escape could be pinned on a six-minute video rather than any Churchillian speeches.
He has his hands tied by the lack of support from the Ball Bearing company board of course, and the statement they rushed out in response to public demand was somewhat short of Churchillian.
The boys find out pretty quickly if you are covering for your inefficiencies by putting great Churchillian speeches together.
No doubt he sees himself as some kind of Churchillian gure that history will prove right, yet experts and former diplomats were not short of evidence as they tore apart his arguments.
This isn't Churchillian prose, but it makes the point.
He said: "There will be no Churchillian speeches from me in the dressing room.
Instead of a stirring Churchillian team talk, he'll tell his men: "Look, it'd be lovely if we won but the main thing is that nobody gets hurt.
To borrow the Churchillian metaphor, the US president intends to try jaw-jaw ahead of war-war.
McKeown, All that''s missing from the article in the ECHO (Friday, December 14) is Joe Anderson''s photo, which should have shown him giving our fearless leader a Churchillian 'two fingers' and a quote to go with it: "Government interference is something up with which we will not put.