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 (sĭs′ə-rō′), Marcus Tullius 106-43 bc.
Roman statesman, orator, and philosopher. A major figure in the last years of the Republic, he is best known for his orations against Catiline and for his mastery of Latin prose. His later writings introduced Greek philosophy to Rome.

Cic′e·ro′ni·an adj.


n, pl -ros
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a measure for type that is somewhat larger than the pica
[C19: from its first being used in a 15th-century edition of the writings of Marcus Tullius Cicero (106–43 bc), the Roman consul, orator, and writer]


(Biography) Marcus Tullius (ˈmɑːkəs ˈtʌlɪəs). 106–43 bc, Roman consul, orator, and writer. He foiled Catiline's conspiracy (63) and was killed by Mark Antony's agents after he denounced Antony in the Philippics. His writings are regarded as a model of Latin prose. Formerly known in English as: Tully


(ˈsɪs əˌroʊ)

1. Marcus Tullius, ( “Tully” ), 106–43 B.C., Roman statesman, orator, and writer.
2. a city in NE Illinois, near Chicago. 61,670.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cicero - a linear unit of the size of type slightly larger than an em
linear measure, linear unit - a unit of measurement of length
2.Cicero - a Roman statesman and orator remembered for his mastery of Latin prose (106-43 BC)Cicero - a Roman statesman and orator remembered for his mastery of Latin prose (106-43 BC)


[ˈsɪsərəʊ] NCicerón


[ˈsɪsəˌrəʊ] nCicerone m
References in classic literature ?
Cicero, when he buried his darling and only daughter, had a heart as full of honest grief as poor Tom's,--perhaps no fuller, for both were only men;--but Cicero could pause over no such sublime words of hope, and look to no such future reunion; and if he had seen them, ten to one he would not have believed,--he must fill his head first with a thousand questions of authenticity of manuscript, and correctness of translation.
Imagine with thyself, courteous reader, how often I then wished for the tongue of Demosthenes or Cicero, that might have enabled me to celebrate the praise of my own dear native country in a style equal to its merits and felicity.
Many and great were the attentions shown to Don Quixote by the newly married couple, who felt themselves under an obligation to him for coming forward in defence of their cause; and they exalted his wisdom to the same level with his courage, rating him as a Cid in arms, and a Cicero in eloquence.
The mate of the Cicero was seeing his friend on board.
de Port Royal, and he had made a collection, en passant, in the society of Athos and Aramis, of many morsels of Seneca and Cicero, translated by them, and applied to the uses of common life.
With the hereditary legislator in whom eloquence is a far-descended attainment--a rich echo repeated by powerful voices from Cicero downward--we will match some wondrous backwoodsman, who has caught a wild power of language from the breeze among his native forest boughs.
Of this state hear what Cicero saith: Quam volumus licet, patres conscripti, nos amemus, tamen nec numero Hispanos, nec robore Gallos, nec calliditate Poenos, nec artibus Graecos, nec denique hoc ipso hujus gentis et terrae domestico nativoque sensu Italos ipsos et Latinos; sed pietate, ac religione, atque hac una sapientia, quod deorum immortalium numine omnia regi gubernarique perspeximus, omnes gentes nationesque superavimus.
I see you have had our Lowick Cicero here," she said, seating herself comfortably, throwing back her wraps, and showing a thin but well-built figure.
Vergil and Cicero were regarded no longer as mysterious prophets from a dimly imagined past, but as real men of flesh and blood, speaking out of experiences remote in time from the present but no less humanly real.
As Garrick, whom I regard in tragedy to be the greatest genius the world hath ever produced, sometimes condescends to play the fool; so did Scipio the Great, and Laelius the Wise, according to Horace, many years ago; nay, Cicero reports them to have been "incredibly childish.
S-1 The Clerk is seeking a licensed and bonded vendor to relocate approximately 106,200 storage boxes located at the Cicero Records Storage and Digital Imaging Center ( Cicero Records Center ), located at 1330 S.
The above distinction, though Cicero himself for obvious reasons, when one considers the time of the publication of the work (46 BCE), does not state explicitly that he did it, is absolutely evident in his work, as it will be seen from the following analysis.