Ciceronianism

Ciceronianism

the imitation of Cicero’s literary and oratorical style. — Ciceronist, n. — Ciceronian, adj.
See also: Literary Style
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Mack discusses rhetoric's role in the development of vernacular culture in the debates over Ciceronianism and in the very popular Renaissance courtesy book.
For Ciceronianism in Spain see also Asensio (Ciceronianos), Lopez Grigera (Introduction 4-6) and the bibliography cited therein.
A steadfast advocate of eloquent Latin, he displayed scornful opposition to the champions of Ciceronianism in such works as De Latinitate falso suspecta (1576), Pseudocicero dialogus (1577), and Nizoliodidascalus (1578).
He uses these works alongside Spenser's View of the Present State of Ireland to argue that there was an ideological shift in English humanism away from irenic Ciceronianism towards a more militant Tacitean stance as the position in Munster deteriorated through the 1580s and 90s: 'Advising the prince carefully and cautiously through coded language and well-chosen examples had to give way to a more urgent and dispassionate mode of analysis that would reach those who had the power to act decisively' (p.
It was the tradition of both modern Aristotelianism and modern Ciceronianism combined with Ramism, Cartesianism, and Wolffianism.
Pietro Bembo is best-known as the author of the Prose della volgar lingua and as the advocate, together with Iacopo Sadoleto, of Renaissance Ciceronianism.
Through subtle inter-textual readings, Virginie Leroux describes Marc-Antoine Muret's assimilation of Ciceronianism in Italy that, introduced to members of the Brigade, reconciles ancient auctoritas with individual insight.
55) Greece and the Gospel were, for Erasmus, the sources of true philosophy, and in his view Ciceronianism had significantly dimmed their light.
In the discussion of anti-Ciceronianism Banos, following the lead of Fumaroli and others, reevaluates the pioneering views of Morris Croll concerning the new Atticism, which abandoned the elaborate musicality of Ciceronianism for a more unadorned, natural style.
137) On Ciceronianism, see D'Amico, 1988b, 280-83; Monfasani, 1988, 186-94; ibid.
102) Barbaro's dismissiveness towards the Ciceronian tradition of rhetorical theory represented by George of Trebizond may also reflect his distance from the stylistic tradition of Ciceronianism (on which see D'Amico, 364).
Alciato criticizes him as a historian here, but elsewhere also commends his attitude to Ciceronianism (see below on 9.