Ciceronianism

Ciceronianism

the imitation of Cicero’s literary and oratorical style. — Ciceronist, n. — Ciceronian, adj.
See also: Literary Style
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From [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] into Philosophia: Classicism and Ciceronianism.
Letter-writing, as one would expect, got caught up in the larger scholarly movements of the sixteenth century, with some writers favoring a strict Ciceronianism and others the more eclectic style of Erasmus and Poliziano.
Mack discusses rhetoric's role in the development of vernacular culture in the debates over Ciceronianism and in the very popular Renaissance courtesy book.
Much of the intellectual history of early modern England has been written as a story of emergent ideologies, with constitutionalism, Ciceronianism, Tacitism (new humanism), de factoism, divine right, ascending political legitimacy, mixed monarchy theory, liberalism, and republicanism all being treated as arising between the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.
For Ciceronianism in Spain see also Asensio (Ciceronianos), Lopez Grigera (Introduction 4-6) and the bibliography cited therein.
A steadfast advocate of eloquent Latin, he displayed scornful opposition to the champions of Ciceronianism in such works as De Latinitate falso suspecta (1576), Pseudocicero dialogus (1577), and Nizoliodidascalus (1578).
He uses these works alongside Spenser's View of the Present State of Ireland to argue that there was an ideological shift in English humanism away from irenic Ciceronianism towards a more militant Tacitean stance as the position in Munster deteriorated through the 1580s and 90s: 'Advising the prince carefully and cautiously through coded language and well-chosen examples had to give way to a more urgent and dispassionate mode of analysis that would reach those who had the power to act decisively' (p.
Leff, Michael, "Burke's Ciceronianism," in Herbert W.
Ciceronianism, a term as old as Erasmus's satire Ciceronianus, describes just that pedantic and restrictive historical model of good taste Pater has been condemning throughout "Style.
It was the tradition of both modern Aristotelianism and modern Ciceronianism combined with Ramism, Cartesianism, and Wolffianism.
Ciceronem (1535), also known as Nizolius sive Thesaurus Ciceronianus, which had at least seventy editions by 1630, and was a key text in the second-wave debate over imitatio and Ciceronianism in Italy and throughout Northern Europe.