Cinderella

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Related to Cinderella complex: Peter Pan syndrome

Cin·der·el·la

 (sĭn′də-rĕl′ə)
n.
One that unexpectedly achieves recognition or success after a period of obscurity and neglect.

[After Cinderella, , the fairy-tale character who escapes from a life of drudgery and marries a prince, translation of French Cendrillon.]

Cinderella

(ˌsɪndəˈrɛlə)
n
1. a girl who achieves fame after being obscure
2.
a. a poor, neglected, or unsuccessful person or thing
b. (as modifier): a Cinderella service within the NHS.
3. (modifier) relating to dramatic success: a Cinderella story.
[C19: after Cinderella, the heroine of a fairy tale who is aided by a fairy godmother]

Cin•der•el•la

(ˌsɪn dəˈrɛl ə)

n., pl. -las.
1. a heroine of a fairy tale who is maltreated by a stepmother but achieves happiness and marries a prince through the intervention of a fairy godmother.
2. a person who achieves sudden success, esp. after obscurity or neglect.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Cinderella - a woman whose merits were not been recognized but who then achieves sudden success and recognitionCinderella - a woman whose merits were not been recognized but who then achieves sudden success and recognition
adult female, woman - an adult female person (as opposed to a man); "the woman kept house while the man hunted"
2.Cinderella - a fictional young girl who is saved from her stepmother and stepsisters by her fairy godmother and a handsome prince
Translations
Popelka
Askepot
Cindrulino
Tuhkimo
Pepeljuga
Hamupipőke
シンデレラ
Askepott
Cinderela
Popoluška
Pepelka
Pepeljuga
Askungen

Cinderella

[ˌsɪndəˈrelə] NCenicienta f
it's the Cinderella of the artses la hermana pobre de las artes

Cinderella

[ˌsɪndəˈrɛlə] nCendrillon

Cinderella

n (lit, fig)Aschenputtel nt

Cinderella

[ˌsɪndəˈrɛlə] nCenerentola
References in periodicals archive ?
Some dramas back up their plot by using a Cinderella complex to appeal to viewers, but in 'Fight for My Way', the characters are all struggling in their respective lives.
Once Upon a Time is, in essence, a rewriting of Disney's already rewritten adaptations of fairy tales--and this version is directly situated in a postfeminist context, designed to appeal to an audience that might be critical of the Cinderella Complex, or actively indoctrinated in "Princess Culture" and, in particular, interested in reexamining matrilineal relationships.
The characters you will meet in each chapter of "Your Ultimate Success Plan" are quite relatable and include professional women and men plagued with the Cinderella complex, waiting patiently (and hopelessly) to be rescued; the insecure who subjugate their core identities to get others to like them; and the perennial complainers who merely want to vent, not solve.