encryption

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en·cryp·tion

 (ĕn-krĭp′shən)
n. Computers
1. The process or result of encrypting data.
2. Cryptography.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.encryption - the activity of converting data or information into codeencryption - the activity of converting data or information into code
coding, steganography, cryptography, secret writing - act of writing in code or cipher
compression - encoding information while reducing the bandwidth or bits required
data encryption - (computer science) the encryption of data for security purposes
Translations

encryption

[ɪnˈkrɪpʃən] Ncodificación f

encryption

[ɪnˈkrɪpʃən]
n [data, message] → cryptage m
modif [technology, software, program] → de cryptage; [code] → de cryptage

encryption

n (Comput, Telec, TV) → Verschlüsselung f; encryption program/systemVerschlüsselungsprogramm nt/-system nt
References in classic literature ?
As to the cipher systems supposed to reveal hidden messages in the plays: First, no poet bending his energies to the composition of such masterpieces as Shakspere's could possibly concern himself at the same time with weaving into them a complicated and trifling cryptogram.
Among the topics are quantifying the effects of urbanization on climate change by analyzing images from remote sensing, a Bayesian approach to classifying mammographic masses, the perception and adoption of mobile Internet service quality in Iraq, a novel approach for generating the key stream of a cipher system using a random forest data mining algorithm, and an active learning system in the context of the social semantic Web.
DES is a symmetric block cipher system that was widely used for more than two decades as encryption scheme by US federal agencies and private sector.
This test measures also the effective size of the key for cipher system that uses the source like key generators.
The message below was created using an ancient Roman cipher system.
In the almost thirty years since the public revelation that the Allies in World War II broke substantial portions of the German ENIGMA cipher system, Allied codebreaking has become a staple of our understanding of the Battle of the Atlantic.
Hellman proposed a new cipher system, public key, that is now in popular use.
The feedback mechanism in the modified Vernam Cipher is the game changing method and it makes the entire cipher system very secure.
The new attack relies solely on the application of a timing attack, a technique typically used to break cipher system implementations, to exploit some inherent weaknesses in the indexing algorithms used by most commercial database management systems.