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cite

 (sīt)
v. cit·ed, cit·ing, cites
v.tr.
1.
a. To quote or refer to (a book or author, for example) as an authority or example in making an argument.
b. Law To refer to (a previous court decision or other legal precedent), as when arguing a case.
2. To mention or bring forward as support, illustration, or proof: cited several instances of insubordinate behavior.
3.
a. To commend officially for meritorious action in military service.
b. To honor formally.
4. To issue a notice of violation to: was cited by the police for jaywalking.
v.intr. Law
To make reference to a previous court decision. Often used with to: The lower court cited to the Supreme Court decision issued last year.
n. Informal
A citation or quotation.

[Middle English citen, to summon, from Old French citer, from Latin citāre; see keiə- in Indo-European roots.]

cit′a·ble adj.

cite

(saɪt)
vb (tr)
1. to quote or refer to (a passage, book, or author) in substantiation as an authority, proof, or example
2. (Military) to mention or commend (a soldier, etc) for outstanding bravery or meritorious action
3. (Law) to summon to appear before a court of law
4. to enumerate: he cited the king's virtues.
[C15: from Old French citer to summon, from Latin citāre to rouse, from citus quick, from ciēre to excite]
ˈcitable, ˈciteable adj
ˈciter n

cite1

(saɪt)

v.t. cit•ed, cit•ing.
1. to quote (a passage, book, author, etc.), esp. as an authority.
2. to mention in support, proof, or confirmation; refer to as an example: He cited instances of abuse.
3. to summon to appear in court.
4. to call to mind; recall: citing my gratitude to her.
5. to mention (a soldier, unit, etc.) in official dispatches, as for gallantry.
6. to commend, as for outstanding service or devotion to duty.
7. to summon or call; rouse to action.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Late Latin citāre to summon before a church court; in Latin, to hurry, set in motion, summon before a court, frequentative of ciēre to move]
cit′a•ble, cite′a•ble, adj.
cit′er, n.

cite2

(saɪt)

n.
[by shortening]

cite


Past participle: cited
Gerund: citing

Imperative
cite
cite
Present
I cite
you cite
he/she/it cites
we cite
you cite
they cite
Preterite
I cited
you cited
he/she/it cited
we cited
you cited
they cited
Present Continuous
I am citing
you are citing
he/she/it is citing
we are citing
you are citing
they are citing
Present Perfect
I have cited
you have cited
he/she/it has cited
we have cited
you have cited
they have cited
Past Continuous
I was citing
you were citing
he/she/it was citing
we were citing
you were citing
they were citing
Past Perfect
I had cited
you had cited
he/she/it had cited
we had cited
you had cited
they had cited
Future
I will cite
you will cite
he/she/it will cite
we will cite
you will cite
they will cite
Future Perfect
I will have cited
you will have cited
he/she/it will have cited
we will have cited
you will have cited
they will have cited
Future Continuous
I will be citing
you will be citing
he/she/it will be citing
we will be citing
you will be citing
they will be citing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been citing
you have been citing
he/she/it has been citing
we have been citing
you have been citing
they have been citing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been citing
you will have been citing
he/she/it will have been citing
we will have been citing
you will have been citing
they will have been citing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been citing
you had been citing
he/she/it had been citing
we had been citing
you had been citing
they had been citing
Conditional
I would cite
you would cite
he/she/it would cite
we would cite
you would cite
they would cite
Past Conditional
I would have cited
you would have cited
he/she/it would have cited
we would have cited
you would have cited
they would have cited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cite - a short note recognizing a source of information or of a quoted passagecite - a short note recognizing a source of information or of a quoted passage; "the student's essay failed to list several important citations"; "the acknowledgments are usually printed at the front of a book"; "the article includes mention of similar clinical cases"
annotation, notation, note - a comment or instruction (usually added); "his notes were appended at the end of the article"; "he added a short notation to the address on the envelope"
photo credit - a note acknowledging the source of a published photograph
cross-index, cross-reference - a reference at one place in a work to information at another place in the same work
Verb1.cite - make reference to; "His name was mentioned in connection with the invention"
have in mind, think of, mean - intend to refer to; "I'm thinking of good food when I talk about France"; "Yes, I meant you when I complained about people who gossip!"
commend, remember - mention as by way of greeting or to indicate friendship; "Remember me to your wife"
speak of the devil - mention someone's name who just then appears
remember - mention favorably, as in prayer; "remember me in your prayers"
quote, cite - refer to for illustration or proof; "He said he could quote several instances of this behavior"
touch on - refer to or discuss briefly
invoke, appeal - cite as an authority; resort to; "He invoked the law that would save him"; "I appealed to the law of 1900"; "She invoked an ancient law"
namedrop - refer to people that one assumes one's interlocutors admire in order to try to impress them
bring up, raise - put forward for consideration or discussion; "raise the question of promotions"; "bring up an unpleasant topic"
drag up, dredge up - mention something unpleasant from the past; "Drag up old stories"
cross-refer - refer from one entry to another, as in catalogues, books, and lists
2.cite - commendcite - commend; "he was cited for his outstanding achievements"
acknowledge, notice - express recognition of the presence or existence of, or acquaintance with; "He never acknowledges his colleagues when they run into him in the hallway"; "She acknowledged his complement with a smile"; "it is important to acknowledge the work of others in one's own writing"
3.cite - refer to; "he referenced his colleagues' work"
authorship, penning, writing, composition - the act of creating written works; "writing was a form of therapy for him"; "it was a matter of disputed authorship"
indite, pen, write, compose - produce a literary work; "She composed a poem"; "He wrote four novels"
4.cite - repeat a passage from; "He quoted the Bible to her"
ingeminate, iterate, reiterate, repeat, restate, retell - to say, state, or perform again; "She kept reiterating her request"
quote, cite - refer to for illustration or proof; "He said he could quote several instances of this behavior"
misquote - quote incorrectly; "He had misquoted the politician"
5.cite - refer to for illustration or proof; "He said he could quote several instances of this behavior"
quote, cite - repeat a passage from; "He quoted the Bible to her"
cite, mention, refer, advert, name, bring up - make reference to; "His name was mentioned in connection with the invention"
6.cite - advance evidence forcite - advance evidence for      
bear witness, evidence, testify, prove, show - provide evidence for; "The blood test showed that he was the father"; "Her behavior testified to her incompetence"
7.cite - call in an official matter, such as to attend court
vouch - summon (a vouchee) into court to warrant or defend a title
send for, call - order, request, or command to come; "She was called into the director's office"; "Call the police!"
demand - summon to court

cite

verb
1. quote, name, evidence, advance, mention, extract, specify, allude to, enumerate, adduce She cites a favourite poem by George Herbert.
2. (Law) summon, call, subpoena The judge ruled a mistrial and cited the prosecutors for gross misconduct.

cite

verb
1. To refer to by name:
2. To bring forward for formal consideration:
Archaic: allege.
Translations

cite

[saɪt] VT
1. (= quote) → citar
2. (Jur) he was cited to appear in courtlo citaron para que se compareciera ante el tribunal
3. (Mil) → mencionar, citar

cite

[ˈsaɪt] vt
(= quote) [+ example] → citer
(in court) [+ man, woman] → citer; [fact] → citer

cite

vt
(= quote)anführen, zitieren
(Mil) → belobigen, lobend erwähnen (for wegen)
(Jur) → vorladen; he was cited to appearer wurde vorgeladen, er erhielt eine Vorladung; he was cited as the co-respondent (= mentioned)er wurde als der Dritte in der Scheidungssache genannt

cite

[saɪt] vtcitare
he was cited to appear in court (Law) → fu citato in tribunale
to cite as an example → portare come esempio

cite

vt. citar, referirse a.
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Significado y funcion de las citas de Isaias en la obra lucana, Estella: Verbo Divino, 2017, 315 pp.
en su estructura canonica el DD suele estar constituido por una expresion introductora (EI) que contiene un verbo de reporte (generalmente conjugado), una cita directa (CD), marcada tipograficamente por guiones o comillas, y el contenido citado (CC), que siempre reproduce un enunciado.
CITA has an important role to ensure that inspection standards and techniques are appropriate for vehicle technologies today and in the future.
Leyenda: Julian, de 31 anos, tendra una segunda cita con Sara, unaabogada de 27.
Apenas 47 minutos despues de enviado mi correo, recibi respuesta de su secretaria particular adjunta, Maria del Carmen Fernandez Dosal, quien me comunico que enseguida se pondrian en contacto conmigo, via telefonica, para agendar una cita, misma que quedo pactada por Rosa Isela Vazquez desde la Ciudad de Mexico
Borges cita en primer lugar la traduccion latina, la Vulgata, que, ya hemos visto en la lista de biblias de "El libro de arena".
En los tiempos presentes, el control sobre la informacion, de los textos publicados y sus correspondientes citas, asi como las nuevas propuestas de medicion, entre las que se encuentra este trabajo, firmado por un grupo de expertos en este campo: Enrique Orduna-Malea, Alberto Martin-Martin, Juan M.
La teoria y la critica literaria modernas han mostrado un interes creciente por la cita desde Julia Kristeva y su seminal trabajo sobre la intertextualidad en Semiotica, hasta la obra reciente de Gary Saul Morson, The Words of Others: From Quotations to Culture--ambos, por cierto, profundos deudores de Bajtin--, pasando notablemente por Antoine Compagnon, entre otros, a quienes remito al lector, pues no pretendo, desde luego, hacer aqui un repaso de las principales aportaciones teoricas al estudio de la cita.
El porcentaje del total de citas en los titulos es de un 8,26%: de los que un 7,85% lo hace en forma de cita textual, un 0,37% en forma de cita indirecta y un 0,04% combina cita directa e indirecta.
trabajos donde se cita a la especie como sinantropica).
Existen varios sistemas de citacion o citas determinados por la forma como se menciona una fuente en un texto, ademas de como y donde se escriben las referencias.