dismissal

(redirected from Civil Proceedings)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Financial.

dis·miss·al

 (dĭs-mĭs′əl)
n.
1.
a. The act of dismissing.
b. The condition of being dismissed.
2. An order or notice of discharge.

dismissal

(dɪsˈmɪsəl)
n
1. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) an official notice of discharge from employment or service
2. the act of dismissing or the condition of being dismissed. Also called: dismission

dis•miss•al

(dɪsˈmɪs əl)

also dis•mis•sion

(-ˈmɪʃ ən)

n.
1. an act or instance of dismissing.
2. the state of being dismissed.
3. a spoken or written order of discharge as from employment.
[1800–10]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dismissal - a judgment disposing of the matter without a trial
judicial decision, judgment, judgement - (law) the determination by a court of competent jurisdiction on matters submitted to it
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
2.dismissal - official notice that you have been fired from your jobdismissal - official notice that you have been fired from your job
notice - advance notification (usually written) of the intention to withdraw from an arrangement of contract; "we received a notice to vacate the premises"; "he gave notice two months before he moved"
marching orders, walking papers - (informal) a notice of dismissal or discharge
3.dismissal - permission to go; the sending away of someone
permission - approval to do something; "he asked permission to leave"
4.dismissal - the termination of someone's employment (leaving them free to depart)
superannuation - the act of discharging someone because of age (especially to cause someone to retire from service on a pension)
ending, termination, conclusion - the act of ending something; "the termination of the agreement"
conge, congee - an abrupt and unceremonious dismissal
removal - dismissal from office
deactivation, inactivation - breaking up a military unit (by transfers or discharges)
honorable discharge - a discharge from the armed forces with a commendable record
dishonorable discharge - a discharge from the armed forces for a grave offense (as sabotage or espionage or cowardice or murder)
Section Eight - a discharge from the US Army based on unfitness or character traits deemed undesirable

dismissal

noun
1. the sack, removal, discharge, notice, the boot (slang), expulsion (informal), the push (slang), marching orders (informal), kiss-off (slang, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), the bum's rush (slang), the (old) heave-ho (informal), the order of the boot (slang), your books or cards (informal) his dismissal from his post
2. rejection, refusal, rebuff, knock-back (slang), kick in the teeth (slang), brushoff (slang) the high-handed dismissal of public opinion

dismissal

noun
1. The act of dismissing or the condition of being dismissed from employment:
Informal: ax.
Slang: boot, bounce, sack.
2. The act of ejecting or the state of being ejected:
Slang: boot, bounce.
Translations
إقالَه، صَرْف، طَرْد
propuštěnízamítnutí
afvisningfyring
uppsögn; frávísun
odpust
işten at maizinreddetme

dismissal

[dɪsˈmɪsəl] N
1. (from job) [of worker] → despido m; [of official] → destitución f
2. [of suggestion, idea] → rechazo m
3. (Jur) → desestimación f

dismissal

[ˌdɪsˈmɪsəl] n
(= sacking) [employee] → renvoi m
[person, witness] → renvoi m
(= rejection) [suggestion, idea, report, problem] → refus m de prendre en considération
(LAW) [appeal, claim] → rejet m
the dismissal of the case → la fin de non-recevoir

dismissal

n
(= firing: from job) → Entlassung f
(= permission to leave)Entlassung f; (of assembly)Auflösung f
(= brushing aside: of point, objection, speculation, claim) → Abtun nt
(Jur, of accused) → Entlassung f; (of appeal)Abweisung f, → Einstellung f; (of case, charges)Abweisung f
(Sport, of batsman, team) → Ausschlagen nt

dismissal

[dɪsˈmɪsl] ncongedo; (of worker) → licenziamento; (of official) → destituzione f; (of assembly) → scioglimento
the dismissal of a case (Law) → il non luogo a procedere

dismiss

(disˈmis) verb
1. to send or put away. She dismissed him with a wave of the hand; Dismiss the idea from your mind!
2. to remove from office or employment. He was dismissed from his post for being lazy.
3. to stop or close (a law-suit etc). Case dismissed!
disˈmissal noun
References in periodicals archive ?
As in the case of dismissal of criminal proceedings, where a patient unsuccessfully sues a doctor in a civil case for damages arising from medical malpractice or other unprofessional conduct (such as failure to obtain an informed consent or breach of confidentiality), the doctor may only sue the patient for defamation or abuse of civil proceedings in very limited circumstances.
Following the verdict one of the sex offender's victims started civil proceedings for compensation.
The court in Hudders-field heard that civil proceedings are now in place to recover the funds.
The Court's discussion in Lassiter indicated that the issue of appointed counsel turned not on doctrinal distinctions between criminal and civil proceedings, but instead on whether an individual's personal freedom was at stake.
The statement specifies that no profession or individual is above the law", adding in this connection, that the infringements in the media sector should be dealt with as part of civil proceedings not criminal proceedings.
ASIC s civil proceedings in the Federal Court of Australia are against Astra Resources, directors Jaydeep Biswas and Silvana De Cianni, and former director Barrie Meerkin.
He also discusses alternative, government-initiated mechanisms for enforcing civil rights through criminal and civil proceedings.
Furthermore, the conviction could subject her to administrative or civil proceedings related to her naturalization as a U.
Officials said in a statement: ''This relates to longstanding and ongoing civil proceedings in the United States, to which the Duke of York is not a party.
The civil proceedings challenged in the said eight applications lasted between 6 and 13 years.
Contrary to the intimation in Potier, the historical background does not support the proposition that all legal proceedings are necessarily either criminal or civil proceedings.
Sheriff Colin Miller will sentence him after the outcome of the civil proceedings over the dog dispute.