courage

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cour·age

 (kûr′ĭj, kŭr′-)
n.
The state or quality of mind or spirit that enables one to face danger, fear, or vicissitudes with self-possession, confidence, and resolution; bravery.

[Middle English corage, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *corāticum, from Latin cor, heart; see kerd- in Indo-European roots.]

courage

(ˈkʌrɪdʒ)
n
1. the power or quality of dealing with or facing danger, fear, pain, etc
2. the courage of one's convictions the confidence to act in accordance with one's beliefs
3. take one's courage in both hands to nerve oneself to perform an action
4. obsolete mind; disposition; spirit
[C13: from Old French corage, from cuer heart, from Latin cor]

cour•age

(ˈkɜr ɪdʒ, ˈkʌr-)

n.
the quality of mind or spirit that enables a person to face difficulty, danger, pain, etc., without fear; bravery.
[1250–1300; Middle English corage < Old French, derivative of cuer heart < Latin cor]

Courage


1. the state or condition of being a hero.
2. behavior typical of a hero. — heroic, adj.
courage or bravery occasioned by drunkenness; Dutch courage. — potvaliant, adj.
bravery or courage. Also valience.

Courage

 
  1. Adventurous as a bee —William Wordsworth
  2. As brave as hell —Petronius
  3. As much backbone as an eel —American colloquialism
  4. As much backbone as cooked spaghetti —Harry Prince
  5. (There was) a tragic daring about her, like a moth dancing around a flame —Paige Mitchell
  6. (He died) bold as brass —George Parker

    Common usage has seeded modern-day modifications such as “Bold as brass balls.”

  7. Bold as a dying saint —Elkanah Settle
  8. Bold as a lion —The Holy Bible/Proverbs
  9. Bold as an unhunted fawn —Percy Bysshe Shelley
  10. Bold as love —Edmond Gosse
  11. Bold as Paul in the presence of Agrippa —William Cowper
  12. Brave as a barrel full of bears —Ogden Nash
  13. Brave as a tiger in a rage —Ogden Nash
  14. Brave as winds that brave the sea —Algernon Charles Swinburne
  15. Courage is like a disobedient dog, once it starts running away it flies all the faster for your attempts to recall it —Katherine Mansfield
  16. Courage is like love; it must have hope to nourish it —Napoleon Bonaparte
  17. Courage, like cowardice, is undoubtedly contagious, but some persons are not liable to catch it —Archibald Prentice
  18. Courage, on nearly all occasions, inflicts as much of evil as it imparts of good —Walter Savage Landor
  19. Courageous as a poker player with a royal flush —Mike Sommer
  20. Courageous like firemen. The bell rings and they jump into their boots and go down the pole —Anon
  21. Daring as tickling a tiger —Anon
  22. Fend off pressure like a sharkhunter feeds off danger —Anon
  23. Gallant as a warrior —Beryl Markham
  24. Grew bold, like a general who is about to order an assault —Guy de Maupassant
  25. Have the gall of a shoplifter returning an item for a refund —W.I.E. Gates
  26. Indomitable as a lioness —Aharon Appelfeld
  27. A man without courage is like a knife without edge —Anon
  28. More guts than a gladiator —William Diehl
  29. Nothing so bold as a blind horse —Greek proverb
  30. Over-daring is as great a vice as over-fearing —Ben Jonson
  31. Show nerve of a burglar —Anon
  32. Stand my ground brave as a bear —American country ballad “If You Want to Go A-Courting”
  33. Valiant as a lion —William Shakespeare

    This simile from Henry the Fourth has made lion comparisons part of our every day language. Another lion simile by the Bard is “Walked like one of the lions” from The Two Gentlemen of Verona.

  34. With all the courage of an escaped convict —Honoré de Balzac
  35. Valiant as Hercules —William Shakespeare
  36. (I’ve seen plenty of great big tough guys that was as) yellow and soft as a stick of butter —George Garrett
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.courage - a quality of spirit that enables you to face danger or pain without showing fearcourage - a quality of spirit that enables you to face danger or pain without showing fear
spirit - a fundamental emotional and activating principle determining one's character
mettle, nerve, spunk, heart - the courage to carry on; "he kept fighting on pure spunk"; "you haven't got the heart for baseball"
gallantry, heroism, valiance, valiancy, valor, valorousness, valour - the qualities of a hero or heroine; exceptional or heroic courage when facing danger (especially in battle); "he showed great heroism in battle"; "he received a medal for valor"
dauntlessness, intrepidity - resolute courageousness
Dutch courage - courage resulting from intoxication
stoutheartedness - the trait of having a courageous spirit
fearlessness - the trait of feeling no fear
fortitude - strength of mind that enables one to endure adversity with courage
cowardice, cowardliness - the trait of lacking courage

courage

noun bravery, nerve, fortitude, boldness, balls (taboo slang), bottle (Brit. slang), resolution, daring, guts (informal), pluck, grit, heroism, mettle, firmness, gallantry, valour, spunk (informal), fearlessness, intrepidity, hardihood They do not have the courage to apologise for their actions.
fear, cowardice, timidity, faint-heartedness, cravenness
Quotations
"No one can answer for his courage when he has never been in danger" [Duc de la Rochefoucauld Maxims]
"Sometimes even to live is an act of courage" [Seneca Letters to Lucilius]
"Courage is not simply one of the virtues but the form of every virtue at the testing point" [C.S. Lewis]
"Screw your courage to the sticking place" [William Shakespeare Macbeth]
"As to moral courage, I have very rarely met with two o'clock in the morning courage: I mean instantaneous courage" [Napoleon Bonaparte]

courage

noun
Translations
إِقْدَامشَجاعَـه
odvaha
mod
kuraĝo
rohkeusurheusurhoollisuus
hrabrost
bátorság
hugrekki
勇気
용기
animusfortitudovirtus
drosmedrošsirdība
pogum
mod
ความกล้าหาญ
sự can đảm

courage

[ˈkʌrɪdʒ] Nvalor m, valentía f
courage!¡ánimo!
I haven't the courage to refuseno tengo valor para negarme
to have the courage of one's convictionsobrar de acuerdo con su conciencia
to pluck up one's courage; take one's courage in both handsarmarse de valor
to take courage fromcobrar ánimos or sacar fuerzas de

courage

[ˈkʌrɪdʒ] ncourage m
to have the courage of one's convictions → avoir le courage de ses opinions

courage

nMut m, → Courage f (inf); I haven’t the courage to refuseich habe einfach nicht den Mut, nein or Nein zu sagen; take courage! (liter)nur Mut!; to take courage from somethingsich durch etw ermutigt fühlen; to lose one’s courageden Mut verlieren; to have/lack the courage of one’s convictionsZivilcourage/keine Zivilcourage haben; to take one’s courage in both handssein Herz in beide Hände nehmen

courage

[ˈkʌrɪdʒ] ncoraggio
I haven't the courage to refuse → non ho il coraggio di rifiutare
to have the courage of one's convictions → avere il coraggio delle proprie opinioni or convinzioni
to take one's courage in both hands → prendere il coraggio a due mani

courage

(ˈkaridʒ) , ((American) ˈkə:-) noun
the quality that makes a person able to meet dangers without fear; bravery. It took courage to sail the Atlantic singlehanded.
courageous (kəˈreidʒəs) adjective
having courage. a courageous soldier.
couˈrageously adverb

courage

إِقْدَام odvaha mod Mut θάρρος coraje rohkeus courage hrabrost coraggio 勇気 용기 moed mot odwaga coragem отвага mod ความกล้าหาญ cesaret sự can đảm 勇气

courage

n. coraje, valor, valentía, firmeza.

courage

n valor m, coraje m
References in classic literature ?
But when self- interest has taken the place of faith and each one of us thinks only of himself, and believes in himself alone, how can you expect to find among us much of that civil courage whose very essence consists in self-renunciation?
Ambassador Robert Tuttle opened the ceremony of presenting 72-year-old Salem with the honour of the Civil Courage Prize (established by the Trustees of the Train Foundation to honour civil courage and steadfast resistance to evil at great personal risk).
NEW YORK: Ali Salem, Egyptian author and an outspoken critic of radical Islam, will be awarded the 2008 Civil Courage Prize, the Train Foundation said in a statement Thursday.
We now only fear acts of civil courage because when people renounce lies it cuts short their existence.
In the original citation Suu Kyi was described as "one of the most extraordinary examples of civil courage in Asia in recent decades".
It honors those men and women who resisted and shows our children, by example, that elementary humane and civil courage has been possible, even during the darkest time of our history.
She had received the 2005 Civil Courage Prize, the 2004 Olof Palme Prize, the 2002 Courage in Journalism Award, the 2000 Golden Pen Award from the Russian Union of Journalists, as well as prizes from the Overseas Press Club of America, Amnesty International, and others.
Now we have an exemplar of upright practice, ethical behavior, and civil courage in one of our members, Alberto Mora, until recently the general counsel of the U.