tort

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tort

 (tôrt)
n. Law
A wrong that is committed by someone who is legally obligated to provide a certain amount of carefulness in behavior to another and that causes injury to that person, who may seek compensation in a civil suit for damages.

[Middle English, injury, from Old French, from Medieval Latin tortum, from Latin, neuter past participle of torquēre, to twist; see terkw- in Indo-European roots.]

tor′ti·ous adj.

tort

(tɔːt)
n
(Law) law a civil wrong arising from an act or failure to act, independently of any contract, for which an action for personal injury or property damages may be brought
[C14: from Old French, from Medieval Latin tortum, literally: something twisted, from Latin torquēre to twist]

tort

(tɔrt)

n.
Law. a wrongful act resulting in injury to another's person, property, or reputation, for which the injured party is entitled to seek compensation.
[1350–1400; Middle English: injury, wrong < Old French < Medieval Latin tortum wrong, injustice < Latin tortus twisted, crooked, dubious, past participle of torquēre to twist]

tort

A wrongful act, done deliberately or through negligence, especially one that causes injury or damage and for which the injured party may bring a civil suit.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tort - (law) any wrongdoing for which an action for damages may be broughttort - (law) any wrongdoing for which an action for damages may be brought
actus reus, wrongful conduct, misconduct, wrongdoing - activity that transgresses moral or civil law; "he denied any wrongdoing"
alienation of affection - a tort based on willful and malicious interference with the marriage relation by a third party without justification or excuse
invasion of privacy - the wrongful intrusion by individuals or the government into private affairs with which the public has no concern
trespass - a wrongful interference with the possession of property (personal property as well as realty), or the action instituted to recover damages
libel - a false and malicious publication printed for the purpose of defaming a living person
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Translations

tort

[tɔːt] N (Jur) → agravio m, tuerto m

tort

n (Jur) → Delikt nt
References in periodicals archive ?
The case has drawn considerable attention because it is a relatively new type of civil tort claim, one that is not permitted in every state at present.
To do so the insurers must train their staff to recognize the elements of both the crime of insurance fraud and the elements of the civil tort of insurance fraud.
For several decades, business owners have been required to tread carefully when dealing with competitors, lest they run afoul of laws which make competition, or "intentional interference with economic relations" an actionable civil tort if done with "improper purpose" or through "improper means.
After all, the purpose of a survey is to determine whether a facility is in substantial compliance with federal regulations, not whether the civil tort of negligence occurred.
11(1), that "raised the degree of negligence necessary to maintain a civil tort action against policymaking employees from gross negligence to culpable negligence" was constitutional.
After all, the goal of a civil tort is to prove that a chemical causes the alleged injury.
In January 2010, the Palestinian Centre for Human Rights (PCHR) filed a civil compensation case before the Israeli court on Mahmoud's behalf but, on 27 February 2013 the case was arbitrarily dismissed on the grounds that certain Israeli legal provisions, in particular a 2012 amendment to the Israeli Civil Tort Law, absolve the State of Israel of any liability arising from the damages caused by Israeli forces during a 'combat action'.
This Article analyzes the implications of legal pluralism when religious family law conflicts with state civil tort law.
We present four alternative models: the tort model (in which the left-behind parent brings a civil tort claim against the abducting parent), the contract model (in which the left-behind parent brings a civil contract claim against the abducting parent when a contract between the parents has been breached), the criminal model (in which compensation is awarded in criminal proceedings against the abducting parent), and the Abduction Convention model (in which compensation is awarded by the court of the state which is requested to return the child, as part of the proceedings under the Hague Convention).
The actual or potential imposition of civil tort liability changes the behavior of others.
Part IV argues that civil tort or restitution claims provide several advantages for child pornography victims seeking civil redress and concludes that such victims should seek a remedy in the civil system.