Classical Chinese


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Classical Chinese

n.
The written form of Chinese from about the fifth century bc to the end of the Han dynasty in ad 220.
adj.
Of or relating to Classical Chinese.
References in periodicals archive ?
The show, which has been seen across Europe, features classical Chinese musical instruments, poetry, song and dance and the audience can expect a range of treats from adaptations of western musicals to Mongolian folk music.
Surrounded by foliage inspired by classical Chinese iconography, an expectant canine engraved in bas-relief lifts a paw and pauses, with its head turned, waiting for its owner's instructions.
Visiting artist-scholar Faye Chunfang Fei will speak about her work of reinventing famous plays by writers such as Shakespeare, Ibsen and Strindberg as classical Chinese operas.
Between Heaven and Earth: Poems in the Classical Chinese, English, and Italian
The classical Chinese tianxia was an East Asian world-system focused on one central state--China--to which all other people's looked for legitimation and leadership, but today's today's millennial world system is similar but focused on the US, a situation he calls the right concept but wrong country.
Carson, however, clings single-mindedly to his mastery of classical Chinese poetry and calligraphy while scorning all things American.
Through Li-Ming's letters, fragments of classical Chinese poetry, and an increasingly unreliable account of the past, characters reveal how "we write ourselves into being with the pen of our actions, the ink of our thoughts.
Chinese teaching in school includes modern and classical Chinese learning.
Studies range from classical Chinese rhetoric (Garrett, 1993; Lu, 1998), comparison of Chinese and Western rhetoric (Chen, 2005; Xiao, 1995), Chinese political rhetoric (Butterfield, 2012; Kluver, 1996; Lu, 1999; Lu & Simons, 2006), and Chinese media discourse (Zhang, 2000; Zhang, 2008).
Virata Collection of Asian Art: A Family Legacy' went under the hammer March 16 in New York, and consisted of exquisite classical Chinese furniture, huanghuali and zitan pieces, from the Ming and Qing dynasties.
Knechtges' "Ruin and Remembrance in Classical Chinese Literature: The 'Fu on the Ruined City' by Bao Zhao.
As Yeh notes early on, narrative tropes, styles, and classical Chinese combined with new forms and vocabularies to form a rich "hybrid that combined translation, adaptation, and creation" (122).
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