Clendinnen


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Clendinnen

(ˌklɛnˈdɪnən)
n
(Biography) Inga. born 1934. Australian historian and writer. Her books include Reading the Holocaust (1998) and Tiger's Eye – a Memoir (2000)
References in periodicals archive ?
Clendinnen, Inga 2003 Dancing with strangers, Text, Melbourne.
La cultura azteca era un totalitarismo sangriento fundado en los sacrificios humanos", afirmo apoyado en una cita de la historiadora y antropologa australiana Inga Clendinnen, autora de Los aztecas: una interpretacion.
Pero todo lo anterior puede ser discutible; empero, lo grave de las palabras del senor Sanchez, seguramente un destacado tecnico de la television hispana, es el haber hecho suyo, conscientemente, lo asegurado por la antropologa australiana Inga Clendinnen, autora de un libro sobre los aztecas: "Lamentar la desaparicion del Imperio azteca es como mostrar pesar por la derrota de los nazis en la II Guerra Mundial".
He quotes anthropologist Inga Clendinnen at length on the gruesome nature of the practice, including descriptions like: "On high occasions warriors carrying gourds of human blood or wearing the dripping skins of their captives ran through the streets .
5) Lipman v Clendinnen (1932) 46 CLR 550, 569-70 (Dixon J).
Sobre estas descripciones, Inga Clendinnen refiere que se tratan mas de un reflejo de la imaginacion de los inquisidores espanoles, que de una constatacion fiable de los ritos mayas.
1700 by Don Juan de Villagutierre Soto-Mayor, and referencing modern work by Inga Clendinnen, Nancy Farris, Grant Jones, Matthew Restall, and others.
4) The novel stirred up vehement critical reactions on the part of a number of historians (Mark McKenna, Inga Clendinnen, Helen MacDonald, John Hirst, and Alan Atkinson automatically come to mind), who claimed that the writer was trespassing on a territory she knew very little about and was not entitled to set foot in.
Inga Clendinnen writes that in 1526 Francisco de Montejo, the Yucatan peninsula's first would-be conqueror and a veteran of Hernan Cortes's conquest of the Tenochtitlan, did not even bother to include a native translator on his military expedition, "an extraordinary omission .
17) Inga Clendinnen has highlighted the way in which Bennelong's actions were highly performative and strategic, suggesting that from very early on he sought an 'alliance with the strangers' as a means of elevating his own status within the local Eora polity.
iii) A telling and frequently quoted passage from acclaimed Australian historian Inga Clendinnen (2001, p.
9) En su libro AztecsAn Interpretation Inga Clendinnen nos informa del papel de la mujer en la sociedad azteca, senalando que: "Rank did not mitigate female destiny: newborn females regardless of caste were all condemned, it would seem, to a destiny of unrelieved domesticity" (153).