Cleopatra's Needle


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Related to Cleopatra's Needle: Rosetta stone

Cleopatra's Needle

(ˌkliːəˈpætrəz; -ˈpɑː-)
n
(Antiques) either of two Egyptian obelisks, originally set up at Heliopolis about 1500 bc: one was moved to the Thames Embankment, London, in 1878, the other to Central Park, New York, in 1880
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The ruins of Caesar's Palace, Pompey's Pillar, Cleopatra's Needle, the Catacombs, and ruins of ancient Alexandria will be found worth the visit.
1878: Cleopatra's Needle, an ancient Egyptian obelisk, 68ft of granite, was presented to Britain by the ruler of Egypt and Sudan and erected on the Thames Embankment.
1878: Cleopatra's Needle, ancient Egyptian obelisk, 68ft of granite, was presented to Britain by the ruler of Egypt and Sudan and erected on the Thames Embankment.
Rainforest Trust and its local partner, the Center for Sustainability, a Palawan-based NGO, will collaborate with the Puerto Princesa city government to develop the new Cleopatra's Needle Forest Reserve.
The Sphinx and Cleopatra's Needle were both damaged by enemy action.
At Cleopatra's Needle, bands were rehearsing, and placards calling for the crowds to "Protest Like An Egyptian".
Luckily for us, despite being October, it was a beautiful sunny day with hardly a cloud in the sky so the 30 minute flight gave us a pin sharp 360-degree view across London, enabling us to pick out landmarks ranging from the nearby Cleopatra's Needle to CanaryWharf on the horizon.
By 1878, the arrival of Cleopatra's Needle in London roused little political interest and, like its cousin in New York's Central Park, seems to have been integrated into the consumer economy through advertising and media, rather than playing a symbolic role.
He also reveals that a time capsule containing pictures of Britain's most attractive women was buried underneath Cleopatra's Needle in 1878.
Much more ink was expended on describing the epic task of carrying the 3350-years-old Egyptian obelisk known as Cleopatra's Needle from the banks of the Nile to the Thames Embankment than on explaining why the obelisk had been carved in the first place (for a while the 186-ton monolith was adrift inside an iron cylinder in the Bay of Biscay, and its rescue was regarded as typical of the sort of deed that won the Empire.
Worthy of Conrad or Stephenson, the transhipment of the obelisk, Cleopatra's Needle, is a tale of both imperial symbolism and high seas adventure, and it was thoroughly covered in a series of articles in The Illustrated London News between March 1877 and September of the following year.