clerk

(redirected from Clerical workers)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

clerk

 (klûrk)
n.
1. A person who works in an office performing such tasks as keeping records, attending to correspondence, or filing.
2.
a. A person who keeps the records and performs the regular business of a court, legislative body, or municipal district.
b. Law A law clerk, as for a judge.
3. A person who works at a sales counter or service desk, as at a store or hotel.
4. A cleric.
5. Archaic A scholar.
intr.v. clerked, clerk·ing, clerks
To work or serve as a clerk: clerked in a store; clerks for a judge.

[Middle English, clergyman, secretary, from Old English clerc and Old French clerc, clergyman, both from Late Latin clēricus, from Greek klērikos, belonging to the clergy, from klēros, inheritance, lot.]

clerk′dom n.
clerk′ship′ n.
Word History: The pronunciation of the word clerk in Middle English and early modern English was something like (klĕrk), with the (ĕ) vowel found in the standard American pronunciation of words like bed, cleft, deck, and men, but used before (r). This pronunciation of er before a consonant as (ĕr), inherited from Middle English, can still be heard in the traditional speech of some parts of Scotland and Ireland today. But the sound combination (ĕr) is no longer found in the standard American pronunciation of words like clerk. During the history of the dialects of Britain that are ancestral to American dialects, probably around the end of the 16th century, Middle English (ĕr) usually became (ûr), as in the American pronunciation of jerk, pert, and clerk itself. In the case of clerk, however, an alternative pronunciation (klärk)—or perhaps more like (klărk), with the vowel (ă) of cat—arose in the south of England, apparently in the 15th century. It was spelled both clark and clerk. Because the word clerk was pronounced with (är) rather than (ĕr) in the south of England, the vowels in the word did not become (ûr). Later, when people began to "drop their r's" in the dialects of southern England during the 18th century, clerk came to be pronounced (kläk), with a long vowel (ä), as it is still pronounced in the Received Pronunciation of clerk in the United Kingdom. Meanwhile, the American colonies and early United States were being populated by immigrants speaking dialects in which the historical change of (klĕrk) to (klärk) had not occurred, and the standard modern American pronunciation of the word became (klûrk). The other pronunciation (klärk) is used in the United States only in the proper name Clark. Similar changes of (ĕ) to (ä) before (r), occurring at various points in the history of Middle and Early Modern English, have given rise to parson (beside person), varsity (beside university), and even varmint (beside vermin).

clerk

(klɑːk; US Canadian klɜːrk)
n
1. a worker, esp in an office, who keeps records, files, etc
2. (Law) clerk to the justices (in England) a legally qualified person who sits in court with lay justices to advise them on points of law
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an employee of a court, legislature, board, corporation, etc, who keeps records and accounts, etc: a town clerk.
4. (Parliamentary Procedure) Also called: clerk of the House (in the UK) a senior official of the House of Commons
5. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Also called: clerk in holy orders a cleric
6. (Commerce) US and Canadian short for salesclerk
7. Also called: desk clerk US and Canadian a hotel receptionist
8. (Historical Terms) archaic a scholar
vb
(intr) to serve as a clerk
[Old English clerc, from Church Latin clēricus, from Greek klērikos cleric, relating to the heritage (alluding to the Biblical Levites, whose inheritance was the Lord), from klēros heritage]
ˈclerkdom n
ˈclerkish adj
ˈclerkship n

clerk

(klɜrk; Brit. klɑrk)

n.
1. a person employed to keep records, file, type, or do other general office tasks.
2. a salesclerk.
3. a person who keeps the records and performs the routine business of a court, legislature, etc.
4. a cleric; ecclesiastic.
5. Archaic. a scholar.
v.i.
6. to act or serve as a clerk.
[before 1000; Middle English, Old English clerc, variant of cleric < Late Latin clēricus cleric]
clerk′ish, adj.
clerk′ship, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.clerk - an employee who performs clerical work (e.g., keeps records or accounts)clerk - an employee who performs clerical work (e.g., keeps records or accounts)
desk clerk, hotel clerk, hotel desk clerk - a hotel receptionist
employee - a worker who is hired to perform a job
file clerk, filing clerk, filer - a clerk who is employed to maintain the files of an organization
paper-pusher - a clerk or bureaucrat who does paperwork
pencil pusher, penpusher - a clerk who does boring paperwork
mapper, plotter - a clerk who marks data on a chart
mail clerk, postal clerk - a clerk in a post office
settler - a clerk in a betting shop who calculates the winnings
shipping clerk - an employee who ships and receives goods
sorter - a clerk who sorts things (as letters at the post office)
tally clerk, tallyman - one who keeps a tally of quantity or weight of goods produced or shipped or received
timekeeper - a clerk who keeps track of the hours worked by employees
2.clerk - a salesperson in a storeclerk - a salesperson in a store    
sales rep, sales representative, salesperson - a person employed to represent a business and to sell its merchandise (as to customers in a store or to customers who are visited)
shop boy - a young male shop assistant
shop girl - a young female shop assistant
Verb1.clerk - work as a clerk, as in the legal business
work - exert oneself by doing mental or physical work for a purpose or out of necessity; "I will work hard to improve my grades"; "she worked hard for better living conditions for the poor"

clerk

noun
2. A person ordained for service in a Christian church:
Informal: reverend.
Translations
بائِعٌ في مَخْزَنكاتِب حِساباتكاتِب، مُوَظَّف مَكْتَبمُسَاعِدُ الـمَبِيعات
obecní rada/tajemníkpříručíprodavačúředník
ekspedientkontorassistentrådmandsekretær
myyntiapulainen
prodavač
irodai dolgozó
afgreiîslumaîurbæjarritariskrifstofumaîur, ritari
販売スタッフ
판매원
klerkasraštvedysvaldininkas
ierēdniskantora darbiniekspārdevējssekretārs
prodajalecuradnik
expedit
พนักงานขาย
kâtipsatıcıtahrirat kâtibi veya evrak müdürütezgahtartezgâhtar
người bán hàng

clerk

[klɑːk, (ʊS) klɜːk]
A. N
1. (Comm) → oficinista mf, empleado/a m/f; (in civil service) → funcionario/a m/f; (in bank) → empleado/a m/f; (in hotel) → recepcionista mf (Jur) → escribano m
see also town B
2. (US) (= shop assistant) → dependiente/a m/f, vendedor(a) m/f
3. (Rel) (archaic) → clérigo m
B. VI (US) → trabajar como dependiente
C. CPD clerk of works N (Brit) (Constr) → maestro/a m/f de obras

clerk

[ˈklɑːrk] n
(British) (= office worker) → employé(e) m/f de bureau
[ˈklɜːrk] (US) (= salesperson) → vendeur/euse m/fClerk of Court ngreffier m (du tribunal)

clerk

[, (US)]
n
(Büro)angestellte(r) mf
(= secretary)Schriftführer(in) m(f); Clerk of the Court (Brit Jur) → Protokollführer(in) m(f); clerk of works (Brit) → Bauleiter(in) m(f)
(US: = shop assistant) → Verkäufer(in) m(f)
(US, in hotel) → Hotelsekretär(in) m(f)

clerk

[klɑːk, ɒm klɜːk] n (in office, bank) → impiegato/a (Am) (shop assistant) → commesso/a; (in hotel) → impiegato/a della reception
Clerk of the Court (Law) → cancelliere m

clerk

(klaːk) , ((American) klə:k) noun
1. a person who deals with letters, accounts etc in an office.
2. a public official in charge of the business affairs of the town council etc. the town clerk.
3. (American) a shop-assistant.

clerk

مُسَاعِدُ الـمَبِيعات prodavač ekspedient Verkäufer βοηθός πωλήσεων dependiente, vendedor myyntiapulainen vendeur prodavač commesso 販売スタッフ 판매원 verkoopassistent salgsassistent sprzedawca assistente de vendas продавец expedit พนักงานขาย tezgahtar người bán hàng 售货员
References in periodicals archive ?
The union said around 1,800 train managers, on-board catering staff, station and clerical workers will be involved.
The ruling makes the nurses and one on one program assistants return to work but not the other clerical workers.
Changes to the minimum wage are based on the nationwide Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W) for a 12-month period ending each Aug.
The 4,800 workers covered by the tentative deal cover mechanical, intermodal and clerical workers at the railway.
455 percent increase in the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers over a 12-month period ending Aug.
The strike by clerical workers at the key US transport gateway, which constitutes the world's seventh biggest commercial harbor, has been costing billions of dollars to the local and wider US economy.
In addition, the unions that represent ranking officers and patrolmen in the Police Department, and clerical workers in the Department of Public Works and Parks have agreed to such changes - the police officials' union and DPW clerical workers have already ratified such deals while the police patrolmen must still take a ratification vote.
A further strike by managers and clerical workers is due the next day.
The Bureau of Labor Statistics publishes CPIs for two population groups: (1) the CPI for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W), which covers households of wage earners and clerical workers that comprise approximately 32 percent of the total population and (2) the CPI for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) and the Chained CPI for All Urban Consumers (C-CPIU), which cover approximately 87 percent of the total population and include in addition to wage earners and clerical worker households, groups such as professional, managerial, and technical workers, the self-employed, short-term workers, the unemployed, and retirees and others not in the labor force.
3) We also conducted a secondary analysis of oral histories collected by the first author in the mid-1980s with 28 white women clerical workers in a Mid-Western U.
28 September 2009 - Finnish silicon wafers maker Okmetic Oyj (HEL: OKM1V) said it will reduce the number of its clerical workers by 22 worldwide as a result of personnel negotiations completed today.
9 percent decrease in the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers, or CPI-W, which were partially offset by a 0.