cliché

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cli·ché

also cli·che  (klē-shā′)
n.
1. A trite or overused expression or idea: "Even while the phrase was degenerating to cliché in ordinary public use ... scholars were giving it increasing attention" (Anthony Brandt).
2. A person or character whose behavior is predictable or superficial: "There is a young explorer ... who turns out not to be quite the cliche expected" (John Crowley).
adj.
Usage Problem Clichéd.

[French, past participle of clicher, to stereotype (imitative of the sound made when the matrix is dropped into molten metal to make a stereotype plate).]
Synonyms: cliché, bromide, platitude, truism
These nouns denote an expression or idea that has lost its originality or force through overuse: a short story weakened by clichés; the bromide that we are what we eat; a eulogy full of platitudes; a once-original thought that is now a truism.
Usage Note: The use of cliché as an adjective meaning "clichéd" goes back to the 1950s. Nonetheless, this usage is traditionally considered improper, and the majority of the Usage Panel agrees with that assessment. In 2011, 79% of the Panel considered the sentence It would sound very cliché to say he died as he lived, helping people to be unacceptable. About a fifth of the Panelists, however, found this usage either somewhat or completely acceptable. As is the case with most nouns, the use of cliché in compounds, such as cliché-ridden, meaning "full of clichés," is perfectly acceptable. The use of cliché as an adjective is alluring because English has borrowed some é-final adjectives from French participles, such as passé and recherché. Because the overwhelming use of cliché is as a noun, however, the English adjective was originally formed directly from that noun by adding -d, the same process that gives us words such as barefaced, single-spaced, and fated.

cliché

(ˈkliːʃeɪ)
n
1. (Linguistics) a word or expression that has lost much of its force through overexposure, as for example the phrase: it's got to get worse before it gets better.
2. an idea, action, or habit that has become trite from overuse
3. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) printing chiefly Brit a stereotype or electrotype plate
[C19: from French, from clicher to stereotype; imitative of the sound made by the matrix when it is dropped into molten metal]
ˈclichéd, ˈcliché'd adj

cli•ché

or cli•che

(kliˈʃeɪ, klɪ-)

n.
1. a trite, stereotyped expression, as sadder but wiser, or strong as an ox.
2. a trite or hackneyed plot, character development, use of form, musical style, etc.
3. anything that has become trite or commonplace through overuse.
adj.
4. clichéd.
[1825–35; < French: stereotype plate, stencil, cliché, n. use of past participle of clicher to make such a plate, said to be imitative of the sound of the metal pressed against the matrix]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cliche - a trite or obvious remark
comment, remark, input - a statement that expresses a personal opinion or belief or adds information; "from time to time she contributed a personal comment on his account"
truism - an obvious truth

cliché

noun platitude, stereotype, commonplace, banality, truism, bromide, old saw, hackneyed phrase, chestnut (informal) I've learned that the cliché about life not being fair is true.

cliché

noun
A trite expression or idea:
Translations
كليشيه: عِبارَه مُتَكَرِّرَه
klišéfráze
clichéfloskel
kliseelatteus
clichélieu communrebattutarte à la crème
kliše
klisja, tugga
clişeu
basmakalıp sözklişe

cliché

[ˈkliːʃeɪ] Ncliché m, tópico m

cliché

[ˈkliːʃeɪ] ncliché m

cliché

nKlischee nt; cliché-riddenvoller Klischees

cliché

[ˈkliːʃeɪ] ncliché m inv

cliché

(ˈkliːʃei) , ((American) kli:ˈʃei) noun
a phrase which has been used too often, and has become meaningless.
References in periodicals archive ?
Book publisher Oxford University Press announced on Friday that it plans to publish It's Been Said Before: A Guide to the Use and Abuse of Cliches by Orin Hargraves.
SIR - When it happens, the cliches are not longer cliches - just some well-worn and inadequate attempts to express the miracle.
Post-postmodern writers intrigued by the fractal dynamics of love and lust but raised within the oppressive penumbra of reality shows, chick flicks, and prime time drama-dies must surely wrestle with how to redecorate the stale cliches of relationships.
The article includes a list of common cliches and a before-and-after sample passage.
IT might sound like a big ask going forward but, if you want to annoy colleagues, then cliches are the way to hit the ground running - but don't shoot the messenger.
The star winger is under pressure to cut out the cliches.
WHEN I read an article recently about cliches, I thought to myself that we've never had it so good with the sheer volume of cliches available to Joe Public.
The cliches about change in our culture are inevitable and endless.
When tech prep first came on the national scene, there were many cliches used to describe its educational process.
Newly available from ITW Transtech, Carol Stream, Ill, the Starlight LPM laser plate maker has a compact design that is said to enable rapid creation of laser cliches for short or long production runs.
Any cliches it finds it will highlight in red, given you the chance to get rid of them before anyone else sees.
Tell you what, we've had it if even the players are getting into cliches like that