diving

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dive 1

 (dīv)
v. dived or dove (dōv), dived, div·ing, dives
v.intr.
1.
a. To plunge, especially headfirst, into water.
b. To execute a dive in athletic competition.
c. To participate in the sport of competitive diving.
2.
a. To go toward the bottom of a body of water: We dove down to check the anchor.
b. To engage in the sport of scuba diving.
c. To submerge under power. Used of a submarine.
3.
a. To fall head down through the air.
b. To descend nose down at an acceleration usually exceeding that of free fall. Used of an airplane.
c. To engage in the sport of skydiving.
4. To drop sharply and rapidly; plummet: Stock prices dove 100 points in a single day of trading.
5.
a. To rush headlong and vanish into something: The fugitive dove into the crowd and escaped.
b. To plunge one's hand into something: dove into the cookie jar.
6. To lunge or leap headfirst: dove for the loose ball.
7. To plunge into an activity or enterprise with vigor and gusto.
8. Sports To exaggerate a fall in an attempt to induce a referee to call a penalty on an opponent.
v.tr.
1. To cause (an aircraft, for example) to dive.
2. To go scuba-diving to or along: We dove that reef last week.
n.
1.
a. A plunge into water, especially done headfirst and in a way established for athletic competition.
b. The act or an instance of going under water, as of a submarine or a skin diver.
c. A nearly vertical descent at an accelerated speed through the air.
2. A rapid or abrupt decrease: Stock prices took a dive.
3.
a. Slang A disreputable or run-down bar or nightclub.
b. A run-down residence.
4. Sports
a. A knockout feigned by a prizefighter: The challenger took a dive.
b. An exaggerated fall, especially by a hockey player, intended to draw a penalty against an opponent.
5.
a. A lunge or a headlong jump: made a dive to catch the falling teacup.
b. Football An offensive play in which the carrier of the ball plunges into the opposing line in order to gain short yardage.

[Middle English diven, from Old English dȳfan, to dip, and from dūfan, to sink; see dheub- in Indo-European roots.]
Usage Note: Either dove or dived is acceptable as the past tense of dive. In our 2008 survey 92 percent of the Usage Panel accepted dove and 72 percent accepted dived in the sentence. Keeping their New Year's Day tradition, the L Street Brownies dove/dived into Dorchester Bay this morning. This may seem odd considering that dived is actually the older form. In fact, the emergence of dove runs against the general tendency of change in English verb forms. Old English had two classes of verbs: strong verbs, whose past tense was indicated by a change in their vowel (a process that survives in such present-day English verbs as drive/drove and fling/flung); and weak verbs, whose past was formed with a suffix related to -ed in Modern English (as in present-day English live/lived and move/moved). Dive comes from one of these weak verbs. Since the Old English period, many verbs have changed from the strong pattern to the weak one; for example, the past tense of step, formerly stop, became stepped. Over the years, in fact, the weak pattern has become so prevalent that we use the term regular to refer to verbs that form their past tense by suffixation of -ed. However, there have occasionally been changes in the other direction: the past tense of wear, now wore, was once werede, and that of spit, now spat, was once spitede. The development of dove is an additional example of the small group of verbs that have swum against the historical tide.

di·ve 2

 (dē′vā)
n.
A plural of diva.

diving

(ˈdaɪvɪŋ)
n
(Swimming, Water Sports & Surfing) the sport or activity of diving into water or spending time under water
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diving - an athletic competition that involves diving into waterdiving - an athletic competition that involves diving into water
swim meet, swimming meet - a swimming competition between two or more teams
match - a formal contest in which two or more persons or teams compete
2.diving - a headlong plunge into water
swim, swimming - the act of swimming; "it was the swimming they enjoyed most": "they took a short swim in the pool"
belly flop, belly flopper, belly whop, belly whopper - a dive in which the abdomen bears the main force of impact with the water
cliff diving - diving into the water from a steep overhanging cliff
flip - a dive in which the diver somersaults before entering the water
full gainer, gainer - a dive in which the diver throws the feet forward to complete a full backward somersault and enters the water feet first and facing away from the diving board
half gainer - a dive in which the diver throws the feet forward and up to complete a half backward somersault and enters the water facing the diving board
jackknife - a dive in which the diver bends to touch the ankles before straightening out
swallow dive, swan dive - a dive in which the diver arches the back with arms outstretched before entering the water
Translations
potápění
dykning
sukellus
ronjenje
búvárkodáslemerülés
飛び込み
다이빙
potapljanjeskakanje v vodo
dykning
การดำน้ำ
công việc lặn

diving

[ˈdaɪvɪŋ]
A. N (professional) → submarinismo m, buceo m; (sporting) → salto m de trampolín, clavado m (CAm, Mex); (from side of pool) → salto m, zambullida f
B. CPD diving bell Ncampana f de buzo
diving board Ntrampolín m
diving suit Nescafandra f, traje m de buceo

diving

[ˈdaɪvɪŋ] n (= underwater swimming) → plongée f (sous-marine)diving bell ncloche f à plongeurdiving board nplongeoir mdiving suit nscaphandre m

diving

n (under water) → Tauchen nt; (into water) → Springen nt; (Sport) → Wasserspringen nt

diving

:
diving bell
diving board
n(Sprung)brett nt
diving header
n (Ftbl) → Flug- or Hechtkopfball m
diving suit
nTaucheranzug m

diving

[ˈdaɪvɪŋ] ntuffi mpl

diving

غَوْص potápění dykning Tauchen κατάδυση salto de trampolín, submarinismo sukellus plongée ronjenje tuffi 飛び込み 다이빙 duiken dykking nurkowanie mergulho подводное плавание dykning การดำน้ำ dalma công việc lặn 潜水

diving

n (sport) buceo
References in periodicals archive ?
The Sultanate of Oman has long been attracting a wide range of discerning travellers, from solo visitors to couples and families, who want to experience the country's high-adrenaline activities, such as desert crossing, paddle-boarding, kite surfing, cliff-diving, hiking, trekking, scuba diving, and snorkelling.
For me, working is great, but you can work anywhere, it's about what you do in your downtime, and in California, my downtime is skydiving, cliff-diving, going to the beach and sitting by the pool - there's so much to do.
The flooded slate quarry has become a focal point for coasteering and cliff-diving events with competitors plummeting 100ft from the top of the quarry into the chilly waters below.
A senior-to-be on the Oregon men's tennis team, Rovello, 21, died as a result of a cliff-diving accident in May at Tamolitch Pool east of Blue River.
14, 2011 she went cliff-diving with friends at Echo reservoir.