climate

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Related to Climate system: climate change

cli·mate

 (klī′mĭt)
n.
1. The meteorological conditions, including temperature, precipitation, and wind, that characteristically prevail in a particular region.
2. A region of the earth having particular meteorological conditions: lives in a cold climate.
3. A prevailing condition or set of attitudes in human affairs: a climate of unrest.

[Middle English climat, from Old French, from Late Latin clima, climat-, from Greek klima, surface of the earth, region; see klei- in Indo-European roots.]

climate

(ˈklaɪmɪt)
n
1. (Physical Geography) the long-term prevalent weather conditions of an area, determined by latitude, position relative to oceans or continents, altitude, etc
2. (Physical Geography) an area having a particular kind of climate
3. a prevailing trend or current of feeling: the political climate.
[C14: from Late Latin clima, from Greek klima inclination, region; related to Greek klinein to lean]
climatic, cliˈmatical, ˈclimatal adj
cliˈmatically adv
Usage: Climatic is sometimes wrongly used where climactic is meant. Climatic is properly used to talk about things relating to climate; climactic is used to describe something which forms a climax

cli•mate

(ˈklaɪ mɪt)

n.
1. the composite or generally prevailing weather conditions of a region, as temperature, air pressure, humidity, precipitation, cloudiness, and winds, throughout the year, averaged over a series of years.
2. a region or area characterized by a given climate: to move to a warm climate.
3. the prevailing attitudes, standards, or conditions of a group, period, or place: a climate of political unrest.
[1350–1400; Middle English: region, latitude < Latin clīmat-, s. of clīma < Greek klima <kli(nein) to slope, lean]
cli•mat′ic (-ˈmæt ɪk) adj.

cli·mate

(klī′mĭt)
The general or average weather conditions of a certain region, including temperature, rainfall, and wind: Caribbean islands have a year-round climate of warm breezes and sunshine.

Climate


the science of the description of climate. — climatographer, n. — climatographical, adj.
the science that studies climate or climatic conditions. — climatologist, n. — climatologic, climatological, adj.
the climate of the inside of a building, airliner, or space ship, as distinguished from that on the outside.
the study of the geographical distribution of rainfall by annual totals. — hyetographic, hyetographical, adj.
the science that studies climate and weather variations. — meteorologie, meteorological, adj. — meteorologist, n.
1. the study of minute gradations in climate that are due to the nature of the terrain.
2. the study of microclimates or climates of limited areas, as houses or communities. — microclimatologist, n. — microclimatologic, microclimatological, adj.
the branch of biology that studies the relation between variations in climate and periodic biological phenomena, as the migration of birds or the flowering of plants. — phenologist, n. — phenologic, phenological, adj.

climate


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The average weather of a region or place measured for all seasons over a number of years. There are three important areas: tropical, temperate and polar.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.climate - the weather in some location averaged over some long period of timeclimate - the weather in some location averaged over some long period of time; "the dank climate of southern Wales"; "plants from a cold clime travel best in winter"
environmental condition - the state of the environment
2.climate - the prevailing psychological state; "the climate of opinion"; "the national mood had changed radically since the last election"
condition, status - a state at a particular time; "a condition (or state) of disrepair"; "the current status of the arms negotiations"

climate

noun
1. weather, country, region, temperature, clime the hot and humid climate of Cyprus
2. atmosphere, environment, spirit, surroundings, tone, mood, trend, flavour, feeling, tendency, temper, ambience, vibes (slang) A major change of political climate is unlikely.
Quotations
"You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows" [Bob Dylan Subterranean Homesick Blues]

climate

noun
1. The totality of surrounding conditions and circumstances affecting growth or development:
2. A prevailing quality, as of thought, behavior, or attitude:
Translations
مُناخمُناخ عاممُناخ، طَقْس
klimapodnebípoměryovzduší
klima
ilmastoilmanalailmapiiri
klima
éghajlatklíma
andi, andrúmsloft, aîstæîurloftslag
気候
기후
klimatasklimatinisklimatosąlygos
klimats
pomery
podnebjeklima
klimat
อากาศ
khí hậu

climate

[ˈklaɪmɪt] Nclima m (fig) → ambiente m
the climate of opinion (fig) → la opinión general

climate

[ˈklaɪmət] n
(= weather) → climat m
(political, economic)climat mclimate change nchangement m climatiqueclimate control n (in car or building) (= air conditioning) → climatisation f

climate

n (lit, fig)Klima nt; the two countries have very different climatesdie beiden Länder haben (ein) sehr unterschiedliches Klima; America has many different climatesAmerika hat viele verschiedene Klimazonen; to move to a warmer climatein eine wärmere Gegend or in eine Gegend mit wärmerem Klima ziehen; the climate of public opiniondie Stimmung in der Öffentlichkeit, das öffentliche Klima; climate conference (Pol) → Klimakonferenz for -gipfel m

climate

[ˈklaɪmɪt] nclima m
the climate of popular opinion → l'opinione pubblica

climate

(ˈklaimət) noun
1. the weather conditions of a region (temperature, moisture etc). Britain has a temperate climate.
2. the conditions in a country etc. the economic/moral climate.
cliˈmatic (-ˈmӕ-) adjective

climate

مُناخ podnebí klima Klima κλίμα clima ilmasto climat klima clima 気候 기후 klimaat klima klimat clima климат klimat อากาศ iklim khí hậu 气候

climate

n. clima.

climate

n clima m
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Understanding the processes that control the earth's climate and predicting future changes in climate due to natural and anthropogenic influences require computer models of the climate system that describe the time-evolving circulation and thermodynamics of the atmosphere and oceans, the two main components of the climate system.

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