Clinton


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Clin·ton

 (klĭn′tən), DeWitt 1769-1828.
American politician who as governor of New York (1817-1823 and 1825-1828) was a principal supporter of the Erie Canal (completed 1825).

Clinton

, George 1739-1812.
Vice president of the United States (1805-1812) under Thomas Jefferson and James Madison. As governor of New York (1777-1795) he was suspicious of centralized government and opposed New York's ratification of the US Constitution.

Clinton

, Sir Henry 1738-1795.
British general in the American Revolution who was commander in chief of British forces in North America (1778-1782).

Clinton

, Hillary Rodham Born 1947.
American politician who served as senator from New York (2001-2009) and as US secretary of state (2009-2013). As the wife of President Bill Clinton, she was first lady of the United States (1993-2001). In 2016 she was the Democratic nominee for president, the first woman to be nominated for president by a major party in the United States.

click for a larger image
Bill Clinton
photographed in 1994

Clinton

, William Jefferson Known as "Bill." Born 1946.
The 42nd president of the United States (1993-2001). His presidency was marked by economic expansion and the first balanced federal budget in thirty years. In 1999 he was impeached by the House of Representatives on perjury and obstruction of justice charges but was acquitted by the Senate on both counts.

Clinton

(ˈklɪntən)
n
1. (Biography) Bill, full name William Jefferson Clinton. born 1946, US Democrat politician; 42nd president of the US (1993–2001)
2. (Biography) his wife, Hillary Rodham. born 1947, US Democrat politician and lawyer: first lady (1993–2001); senator (2001–09); secretary of state (2009–13)

Clin•ton

(ˈklɪn tn)

n.
1. De Witt, 1769–1828, U.S. statesman.
2. George, 1739–1812, vice president of the U.S. 1805–12.
3. Sir Henry, 1738?–95, commander of the British forces in the American Revolutionary War.
4. Hillary Rodham, born 1947, U.S. attorney, social reformer, and politician: senator since 2001 (wife of William J. Clinton).
5. William Jefferson (Bill), born 1946, 42nd president of the U.S. 1993–2001.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Clinton - wife of President Clinton and later a woman member of the United States Senate (1947-)
2.Clinton - 42nd President of the United States (1946-)Clinton - 42nd President of the United States (1946-)
3.Clinton - United States politician who as governor of New York supported the project to build the Erie Canal (1769-1828)Clinton - United States politician who as governor of New York supported the project to build the Erie Canal (1769-1828)
4.Clinton - a town in east central Iowa
Hawkeye State, IA, Iowa - a state in midwestern United States
References in classic literature ?
Evidently the late De Witt Clinton, who died governor of New York in 1828.
Whenever the town rejoiced for a battle won by Washington, or Gates, or Morgan or Greene, the news, in passing through the door of the Province House, as through the ivory gate of dreams, became metamorphosed into a strange tale of the prowess of Howe, Clinton, or Cornwallis.
General James Clinton, the brother of George Clinton, then governor of New York, and the father of De Witt Clinton, who died governor of the same State in 1827, commanded the brigade employed on this duty.
Sir Luke de Ponynges, Sir Thomas West, Sir Maurice de Bruin, Sir Arthur Lipscombe, Sir Walter Ramsey, and stout Sir Oliver Buttesthorn were all marching south with levies from Andover, Arlesford, Odiham and Winchester, while from Sussex came Sir John Clinton, Sir Thomas Cheyne, and Sir John Fallislee, with a troop of picked men-at-arms, making for their port at Southampton.
Bill Clinton, so the story goes, once almost punched Dick Morris in the nose.
Expectations for Senator Hillary Clinton were decidedly low and her greatest impact, it seemed, would be her value in Republican direct mail fundraising appeals.
The program began with Gibson talking with Dick Morris, who was legendarily slimy when he worked for the Clinton White House and scarcely seems to have changed since his estrangement from the president, and Susan Estrich, a Democrat who has the abrasive demeanor of a typical Fox News Channel commentator.
Whether the contested election has cancelled or merely pushed this discussion back a few months remains to be seen, but at least one partisan has been doing his best to make sure that the Clinton legacy is understood in its fullest, most nuanced glory.
The Clinton scandal is an occasion for ethical reflection, but it is far from the most important issue facing ethicists.
To watch it, you'd think the range of political opinion stretches from those who think Congress should impeach the President for lying about a sordid sexual affair to those who would stand by Clinton no matter what he does.
As outlined in Sullivan's article, Clinton has done nothing for our community other than offer harm.