Cnidus

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Related to Cnidos: Praxiteles, Knidos

Cni·dus

also Cni·dos  (nī′dəs)
An ancient Greek city of Asia Minor in present-day southwest Asiatic Turkey. It was noted for its wealth and its magnificent buildings and statuary.

Cnidus

(ˈnaɪdəs; ˈknaɪ-)
n
(Placename) an ancient Greek city in SW Asia Minor: famous for its school of medicine

Cni•dus

(ˈnaɪ dəs)

n.
an ancient city in SW Asia Minor, in Caria: the Athenians defeated the Spartans in a naval battle near here 394 B.C.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, if we only remember that in the latter years of the fourth century Theodosius II brought the Aphrodite of Cnidos of the same Praxiteles to his court in Lausus (36), it is not hard at all to suspect that Constantine himself or any other emperor after him might have brought to the city this other Praxitelean work.
30 (O Venus, regina Cnidi Pahique, o Venus, queen of Cnidos and Paphos) describes an invocation to Venus and other mythical beings (Cupid, the Graces, the Nymphs and Mercury) to come to Glycera's aid, obviously in a plea for success in love.
Desde el campo de la medicina, la existencia de diversas perspectivas de analisis de los problemas de salud se remonta a la antigua Grecia, representadas respectivamente por la Escuela de Cos y la Escuela de Cnidos.
Aqui encontramos las reflexiones de Euxodo de Cnidos y de Aristoteles, asi como los calculos del astronomo Piteas y del gran Eratostenes de Cirene, que llego a establecer casi con exactitud matematica la extension de la circunferencia terrestre.
As nus narrates his voyage to Cnidos with Charicles and Callicratidas and then gives an extensive description of the temple precinct of Aphrodite, the author strives to create an atmosphere of cheerful reverence and pleasant dallying in lush and prosperous surroundings.
30 Venus and Cupid leave Cnidos and Paphos to visit a new shrine established by Glycera.
48) Democedes of Croton was personal physician to Darius I; Apollonides of Cos was the personal physician of Artaxerxes I; while Ctesias of Cnidos and Polycritos of Mende were the physicians of Artaxerxes II (Dandamaev and Lukonin, 296).
Bejouai presents them in this order: the southwest cluster includes the islands of Scyros and Cyprus with the Cypriot city of Idalium; the southeast cluster (partly destroyed) puts Cnidos with two lost companion "islands"; the northeast cluster shows Rhodes, Cytherae and the Cypriot city of Paphos; the northwest cluster has the island of Lemnos, the city of Eryx, and a missing third; while the central cluster depicts the island of Naxos and the cities of Egusa (on Sicily) and Cnossos (on Crete).
La fuente principal es la Indika de Ctesias de Cnidos, un texto extraordinario que abre al Occidente las puertas del Este.
Painstakingly compiled and deftly edited by Larry Brian Radka, The Electric Mirror On The Pharos Lighthouse And Other Ancient Lighting offers an original, informative, and profusely illustrated in-depth study of the incredible lighthouse constructed by Sostras of Cnidos, as well as a serving as a complete reference to a multitude of many other outstanding electrical lighting accomplishments down through history.