co-channel

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Related to Co-channel interference: Adjacent channel interference

co-channel

(ˈkəʊˌtʃænəl)
adj
(Broadcasting) denoting or relating to a radio transmission that is on the same frequency channel as another: co-channel interference.
References in periodicals archive ?
Zhang, "On the effect of co-channel interference on average error rates in Nakagami-fading channels", IEEE Commun.
Based on the same framework, authors further proposed a new channel allocation algorithm that considers both link adaptation and power control mechanisms, in addition to the impact of co-channel interference (CCI) and multiple data rates in [17].
Moreover, the congestion at MAC layer is primarily caused by co-channel interference, self-interference and partial channel interference.
82 MHz, and co-channel interference scenarios, and this means that the center carrier frequency offset should be 10-, 5-, 3.
The aim of this work is to identify the most critical radio link in terms of co-channel interference in different scenarios, and define both appropriate guard distances between the interfering systems and transmitters operational characteristics such that specific Quality of Service requirements are met.
After conducting inquiries, Channel 4 believes that co-channel interference between Irish transmissions across the water and the Arqiva commercial multiplexes (transmitters) may be the reason for the loss of channels," he said.
The trick is making sure users have plenty of aggregate capacity to share while avoiding the co-channel interference that lurks when lots of APs occupy a relatively small space.
1lb/g standard, and in which access points are carefully positioned and "tuned" during the deployment process to mitigate the co-channel interference that can kill transmissions.
NXT6000 has more features such as full DVB-T and NorDig compliance as well as programmable adjacent channel and adaptive co-channel interference cancellation.
The antenna is designed to divide the space around it into three equal radial sectors, thereby minimizing the effects of multi-path and co-channel interference and provides higher accuracy, which can be exploited by position sensing technologies such as enhanced observed time difference, and angle of arrival.
The channel characteristics of LMDS systems are very different from those of fiber, coaxial cable, and lower frequency wireless links, major channel impairments being non-linear high power amplifier (HPA), high phase noise and high co-channel interference.